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Quotations From SAMUEL RICHARDSON

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  • 71.
    Love will draw an elephant through a key-hole.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Lovelace, in Clarissa, vol. 8, p. 149, AMS Press (1990).

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  • 72.
    Prejudices in disfavor of a person fix deeper, and are much more difficult to be removed, than prejudices in favor.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Clarissa, in Clarissa, vol. 7, p. 233, AMS Press (1990).
  • 73.
    The laws were not made so much for the direction of good men, as to circumscribe the bad.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Sir Charles Grandison, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 3, letter 22, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).
  • 74.
    It is better to be thought perverse than insincere.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Clarissa, in Clarissa, vol. 1, p. 318, AMS Press (1990).
  • 75.
    A man may keep a woman, but not his estate.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Thomas Belton, in Clarissa, vol. 4, p. 131, AMS Press (1990).

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  • 76.
    We are all very ready to believe what we like.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Lovelace, in Clarissa, vol. 4, p. 314, AMS Press (1990).

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  • 77.
    The eye is the casement at which the heart generally looks out. Many a woman who will not show herself at the door, has tipt the sly, the intelligible wink from the window.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Lovelace, in Clarissa, vol. 6, p. 344, AMS Press (1990).

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  • 78.
    A beautiful woman must expect to be more accountable for her steps, than one less attractive.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Lucy Selby, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 1, letter 1, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).

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  • 79.
    Those who doubt themselves most generally err least.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1740). Mr. B., in Pamela, vol. 2, p. 279, Riverside (1971).
  • 80.
    All that hoops are good for is to clean dirty shoes and keep fellows at a distance.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Anna Howe, in Clarissa, vol. 2, p. 168, AMS Press (1990).
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