Quotations From SAMUEL RICHARDSON

» More about Samuel Richardson on Poemhunter

 

  • 81.
    Shame is a fitter and generally a more effectual punishment for a child than beating.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1742). Pamela, in Pamela, vol. 4, p. 371.

    Read more quotations about / on: child
  • 82.
    Humility is a grace that shines in a high condition but cannot, equally, in a low one because a person in the latter is already, perhaps, too much humbled.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1742). Pamela, in Pamela, vol. 4, p. 303.
  • 83.
    We can all be good when we have no temptation or provocation to the contrary.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Anna Howe, in Clarissa, vol. 1, p. 176, AMS Press (1990).
  • 84.
    The difference in the education of men and women must give the former great advantages over the latter, even where geniuses are equal.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1742). Pamela, in Pamela, vol. 4, p. 454.

    Read more quotations about / on: education, women
  • 85.
    I never knew a man who deserved to be thought well of for his morals who had a slight opinion of our Sex in general.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Anna Howe, in Clarissa, vol. 7, p. 328, AMS Press (1990).
  • 86.
    The companion of an evening, and the companion for life, require very different qualifications.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. paper dated Feb. 19, 1751, in the periodical edited and otherwise almost completely written by Samuel Johnson. Rambler, no. 97, Yale University Press (1969). Richardson's essay for the Rambler was the only one to have a large sale.

    Read more quotations about / on: life
  • 87.
    Old men, imagining themselves under obligation to young paramours, seldom keep any thing from their knowledge.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Anna Howe, in Clarissa, vol. 5, p. 36, AMS Press (1990).
  • 88.
    Love gratified is love satisfied, and love satisfied is indifference begun.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Belford, in Clarissa, vol. 4, p. 348, AMS Press (1990).

    Read more quotations about / on: love
  • 89.
    Those who have least to do are generally the most busy people in the world.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Sir Charles Grandison, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 2, letter 3, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).

    Read more quotations about / on: people, world
  • 90.
    Women are so much in love with compliments that rather than want them, they will compliment one another, yet mean no more by it than the men do.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Charlotte Grandison, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 1, letter 37, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).

    Read more quotations about / on: women, love
[Hata Bildir]