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Quotations From SENECA

 

  • Believe me, that was a happy age, before the days of architects, before the days of builders.
    Seneca (c. 5-65), Roman writer, philosopher, statesman. Epistulae ad Lucilium, epistle 90.

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  • Nothing becomes so offensive so quickly as grief. When fresh it finds someone to console it, but when it becomes chronic, it is ridiculed, and rightly.
    Seneca (c. 5-65), Roman writer, philosopher, statesman. Epistulae ad Lucilium, epistle 68, l. 13.

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  • Just as I shall select my ship when I am about to go on a voyage, or my house when I propose to take a residence, so I shall choose my death when I am about to depart from life.
    Seneca (c. 5-65), Roman writer, philosopher, statesman. Epistulae ad Lucilium, epistle 70, sct. 11.

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  • The final hour when we cease to exist does not itself bring death; it merely of itself completes the death-process. We reach death at that moment, but we have been a long time on the way.
    Seneca (4 B.C.-A.D. 65), Roman writer, philosopher, statesman. Epistulae ad Lucilium, epistle 24. Full name: Lucius Annaeus Seneca.

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  • Whatever is well said by another, is mine.
    Seneca (c. 5-65), Roman writer, philosopher, statesman. Epistulae ad Lucilium, epistle 16, sct. 7.
  • It is the superfluous things for which men sweat.
    Seneca (c. 5-65), Roman writer, philosopher, statesman. Epistulae ad Lucilium, epistle 4, l. 11.
  • A large part of mankind is angry not with the sins, but with the sinners.
    Seneca (c. 5 B.C.-65 A.D.), Roman writer, philosopher, statesman. De Ira, bk. 2, sct. 28.
  • We often want one thing and pray for another, not telling the truth even to the gods.
    Seneca (c. 5-65), Roman writer, philosopher, statesman. Epistulae ad Lucilium, epistle 95, sct. 2.

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  • Stond who so list upon the Slipper toppe
    Of courtes estates, and lett me heare rejoyce;
    Seneca (4 B.C.-A.D. 65), Roman philosopher, statesman, tragedian. Thyestes. . . Oxford Book of Verse in English Translation, The. Charles Tomlinson, ed. (1980) Oxford University Press.
  • What difference does it make how much you have? What you do not have amounts to much more.
    Seneca (c. 5-65), Roman writer, philosopher, statesman. attributed in Noctes Atticae, bk. 12, ch. 2, sct. 13, Aulus Gellius (second century A.D.).
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