Quotations From SIR ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE


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  • My sister and I, you will recollect, were twins, and you know how subtle are the links which bind two souls which are so closely allied.
    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), British author. Helen Stoner, in "The Adventure of the Speckled Band," The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1891).

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  • I can never bring you to realize the importance of sleeves, the suggestiveness of thumb-nails, or the great issues that may hang from a boot-lace.
    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), British author. Sherlock Holmes, in "A Case of Identity," The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1892).
  • "What business is it of yours, then?"
    "It's every man's business to see justice done."
    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), British author. Henry Wood questioning and Sherlock Holmes replying, in "The Crooked Man," The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes (1892).

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  • London, that great cesspool into which all the loungers and idlers of the Empire are irresistibly drained.
    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), British author. Dr. Watson, in A Study in Scarlet, ch. 1 (1887).

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  • Depend upon it, there is nothing so unnatural as the commonplace.
    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), British author. Sherlock Holmes, in "A Case of Identity," The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1891).
  • From a drop of water a logician could infer the possibility of an Atlantic or a Niagara without having seen or heard of one or the other.
    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), British author. Sherlock Holmes, in A Study in Scarlet, pt. 1, ch. 2 (1887).

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  • The most difficult crime to track is the one which is purposeless.
    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), British author. Sherlock Holmes, in "The Naval Treaty," The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes (1892).
  • For strange effects and extraordinary combinations we must go to life itself, which is always far more daring than any effort of the imagination.
    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), British author. Sherlock Holmes, in "The Red-headed League," The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1891).

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  • When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.
    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), British author. Sherlock Holmes, in The Sign of Four, ch. 6 (1889).

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  • A client is to me a mere unit, a factor in a problem.
    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), British author. Sherlock Holmes, in The Sign of Four, ch. 2 (1890).
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