Quotations From SOREN KIERKEGAARD


 

  • I see it all perfectly; there are two possible situations—one can either do this or that. My honest opinion and my friendly advice is this: do it or do not do it—you will regret both.
    Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish philosopher. "Balance between Esthetic and Ethical," vol. 2, Either/Or (1843, repr. 1987).
  • There are, as is known, insects that die in the moment of fertilization. So it is with all joy: life's highest, most splendid moment of enjoyment is accompanied by death.
    Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish philosopher. "Diapsalmata," vol. 1, Either/Or (1843, trans. 1987).

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  • Jurists say that a capital crime submerges all lesser crimes; and so it is with faith. Its absurdity makes all petty difficulties vanish.
    Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish religious philosopher, and Johannes Climacus, father of existentialism. "The Disciple at Second Hand," ch. 5, p. 87, The Philosophical Fragments or A Fragment of Philosophy, Princeton University Press, Princeton (1946). Kierkegaard's evidence of the irrationality of religion.

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  • I ... begin with the principle that all men are bores. Surely no one will prove himself so great a bore as to contradict me in this.
    Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish philosopher. "Rotation of Crops," Either/Or, vol. 1 (1843, trans. 1944).
  • Philosophy always requires something more, requires the eternal, the true, in contrast to which even the fullest existence as such is but a happy moment.
    Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish philosopher. The Concept of Irony, introduction to pt. 1 (1841, trans. 1966).

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  • At the bottom of enmity between strangers lies indifference.
    Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish philosopher. The Journals of Soren Kierkegaard: A Selection, no. 1144, journal entry for 1850, ed. and trans. by Alexander Dru (1938).
  • The more a man can forget, the greater the number of metamorphoses which his life can undergo, the more he can remember the more divine his life becomes.
    Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish philosopher. The Journals of Soren Kierkegaard: A Selection, no. 429, entry for 1842, ed. and trans. by Alexander Dru (1938).

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  • Far from idleness being the root of all evil, it is rather the only true good.
    Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish philosopher. "The Rotation Method," vol. 1, Either/Or (1843).

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  • Adversity draws men together and produces beauty and harmony in life's relationships, just as the cold of winter produces ice-flowers on the window-panes, which vanish with the warmth.
    Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1955), Danish philosopher. The Journals of Soren Kierkegaard: A Selection, no. 37, entry for January 1836, ed. and trans. by Alexander Dru (1938).

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  • The truth is a snare: you cannot have it, without being caught. You cannot have the truth in such a way that you catch it, but only in such a way that it catches you.
    Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish philosopher. repr. In The Last Years: Journals 1853-55, ed. and trans. by Ronald G. Smith (1965). The Papers of Soren Kierkegaard, vol. 11, pt. 1, sct. 352, ed. P.A. Heiberg and V. Kuhr (1909).

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