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Quotations From STEPHEN BAYLEY

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  • 1.
    In an age robbed of religious symbols, going to the shops replaces going to the church.... We have a free choice, but at a price. We can win experience, but never achieve innocence. Marx knew that the epic activities of the modern world involve not lance and sword but dry goods.
    Stephen Bayley (b. 1951), British design critic. "The Sport of Things," pt. 2, Taste (1991).

    Read more quotations about / on: epic, innocence, world
  • 2.
    Interior design is a travesty of the architectural process and a frightening condemnation of the credulity, helplessness and gullibility of the most formidable consumers—the rich.
    Stephen Bayley (b. 1951), British design critic. "Interiors: Vacuums of Taste," pt. 2, Taste (1991).
  • 3.
    Taste is more to do with manners than appearances. Taste is both myth and reality; it is not a style.
    Stephen Bayley (b. 1951), British design critic. "Taste: The Story of an Idea," pt. 1, Taste (1991).
  • 4.
    Watteau is no less an artist for having painted a fascia board while Sainsbury's is no less effective a business for producing advertisements which entertain and educate instead of condescending and exploiting.
    Stephen Bayley (b. 1951), British design critic. Commerce and Culture, ch. 1 (1989).
  • 5.
    As the twentieth century ends, commerce and culture are coming closer together. The distinction between life and art has been eroded by fifty years of enhanced communications, ever-improving reproduction technologies and increasing wealth.
    Stephen Bayley (b. 1951), British design critic. Commerce and Culture, ch. 1 (1989).

    Read more quotations about / on: culture, together, life
  • 6.
    "Where do architects and designers get their ideas?" The answer, of course, is mainly from other architects and designers, so is it mere casuistry to distinguish between tradition and plagiarism?
    Stephen Bayley (b. 1951), British design critic. Commerce and Culture, ch. 3 (1989).
  • 7.
    The assumption must be that those who can see value only in tradition, or versions of it, deny man's ability to adapt to changing circumstances.
    Stephen Bayley (b. 1951), British design critic. Commerce and Culture, ch. 3 (1989).
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