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Quotations From SUSAN SONTAG

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  • 31.
    In good films, there is always a directness that entirely frees us from the itch to interpret.
    Susan Sontag (b. 1933), U.S. essayist. repr. In Against Interpretation (1966). "Against Interpretation," sct. 7, Evergreen Review (Dec. 1964).
  • 32.
    Existence is no more than the precarious attainment of relevance in an intensely mobile flux of past, present, and future.
    Susan Sontag (b. 1933), U.S. essayist. "'Thinking Against Oneself': Reflections on Cioran," Styles of Radical Will (1969).

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  • 33.
    Pornography is a theatre of types, never of individuals.
    Susan Sontag (b. 1933), U.S. author. "The Pornographic Imagination," (1967).
  • 34.
    Depression is melancholy minus its charms—the animation, the fits.
    Susan Sontag (b. 1933), U.S. essayist. Illness As Metaphor, ch. 7 (1978).

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  • 35.
    Mallarme said that everything in the world exists in order to end in a book. Today everything exists to end in a photograph.
    Susan Sontag (b. 1933), U.S. author. On Photography, ch. 1 (1977). Stephane Mallarme (1842-1898) was a French poet.

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  • 36.
    Silence remains, inescapably, a form of speech.
    Susan Sontag (b. 1933), U.S. author. "The Aesthetics of Silence," (1967).

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  • 37.
    If an irreducible distinction between theatre and cinema does exist, it may be this: Theatre is confined to a logical or continuous use of space. Cinema ... has access to an alogical or discontinuous use of space.
    Susan Sontag (b. 1933), U.S. author. "Theatre and Film," (1966).
  • 38.
    ... the place we assign to pornography depends on the goals we set for our own consciousness, our own experience.
    Susan Sontag (b. 1933), U.S. author. "The Pornographic Imagination," (1967).
  • 39.
    It is the nature of aphoristic thinking to be always in a state of concluding; a bid to have the final word is inherent in all powerful phrase-making.
    Susan Sontag (b. 1933), U.S. essayist. "Writing Itself: On Roland Barthes," introduction, Barthes: Selected Writings (1982).

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  • 40.
    The photographer both loots and preserves, denounces and consecrates.
    Susan Sontag (b. 1933), U.S. essayist. On Photography, "Melancholy Objects," (1977).
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