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Quotations From THOMAS BABINGTON MACAULAY

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  • 1.
    A few more years will destroy whatever yet remains of that magical potency which once belonged to the name of Byron.
    Thomas Babington Macaulay (1800-1859), British historian. repr. In Lord Macaulay's Essays (1889). "Moore's Life of Lord Byron," Edinburgh Review (June 1831).
  • 2.
    We know no spectacle so ridiculous as the British public in one of its periodical fits of morality.
    Thomas Babington Macaulay (1800-1859), British historian, Whig politician. repr. In Critical and Historical Essays (1843). "Moore's Life of Lord Byron," Edinburgh Review (June 1831).
  • 3.
    Logicians may reason about abstractions. But the great mass of men must have images. The strong tendency of the multitude in all ages and nations to idolatry can be explained on no other principle.
    Thomas Babington Macaulay (1800-1859), British historian. repr. In Critical and Historical Essays (1843). "Milton," Edinburgh Review (Aug. 1825).
  • 4.
    I never heard a single expression of fondness for him fall from the lips of any of those who knew him well.
    Thomas Babington Macaulay (1800-1859), British historian, Whig politician. Letter, June 7, 1831, to Hannah and Margaret Macaulay.
  • 5.
    Nothing is so galling to a people not broken in from the birth as a paternal, or in other words a meddling government, a government which tells them what to read and say and eat and drink and wear.
    Thomas Babington Macaulay (1800-1859), British historian, Whig politician. Critical and Historical Essays (1843). Southey's Colloquies on Society, Edinburgh Review (Jan. 1830).

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  • 6.
    The reluctant obedience of distant provinces generally costs more than it [the territory] is worth. Empires which branch out widely are often more flourishing for a little timely pruning.
    Thomas Babington Macaulay (1800-1859), British historian, Whig politician. Critical and Historical Essays (1843). War of the Succession in Spain, Edinburgh Review (Jan. 1833).
  • 7.
    Such night in England ne'er had been, nor e'er again shall be.
    Thomas Babington Macaulay (1800-1859), British poet. The Armada (l. 34). . . Faber Book of Children's Verse, The. Janet Adam Smith, comp. (1953; paperback 1963) Faber and Faber.

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  • 8.
    In every age the vilest specimens of human nature are to be found among demagogues.
    Thomas Babington Macaulay (1800-1859), British historian, Whig politician. History of England, vol. 1, ch. 5 (1849).

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  • 9.
    Persecution produced its natural effect on them. It found them a sect; it made them a faction.
    Thomas Babington Macaulay (1800-1859), British historian, Whig politician. History of England, vol. 1, ch. 1 (1849). Referring to the Puritans and Calvinists.
  • 10.
    His imagination resembled the wings of an ostrich. It enabled him to run, though not to soar.
    Thomas Babington Macaulay (1800-1859), British historian. repr. In Critical and Historical Essays (1843). "John Dryden," Edinburgh Review (January 1828). Of Dryden.

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