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Quotations From THOMAS CARLYLE

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  • 11.
    France was long a despotism tempered by epigrams.
    Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881), Scottish essayist, historian. History of the French Revolution, pt. 1, bk. 1, ch. 1 (1837).
  • 12.
    History, a distillation of rumour.
    Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881), Scottish essayist, historian. History of the French Revolution, pt. 1, bk. 7, ch. 5 (1837).

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  • 13.
    No sadder proof can be given by a man of his own littleness than disbelief in great men.
    Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881), Scottish essayist, historian. On Heroes and Hero-Worship, "The Hero as Divinity," (1841).
  • 14.
    A man willing to work, and unable to find work, is perhaps the saddest sight that fortune's inequality exhibits under this sun.
    Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881), Scottish essayist and historian. Chartism, ch. 4 (1839).

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  • 15.
    The world is a republic of mediocrities, and always was.
    Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881), Scottish essayist, historian. Letter, May 13, 1853, to Ralph Waldo Emerson.

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  • 16.
    The true university of these days is a collection of books.
    Thomas Carlyle "(1795-1881), Scottish essayist, historian. On Heroes and Hero-Worship, "The Hero as Man of Letters," (1841).
  • 17.
    A terrible, beetle-browed, mastiff-mouthed, yellow-skinned, broad-bottomed, grim-taciturn individual; with a pair of dull-cruel-looking black eyes, and as much Parliamentary intellect and silent-rage in him ... as I have ever seen in any man.
    Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881), Scottish essayist, historian. Letter, June 24, 1824, to his brother. New Letters of Thomas Carlyle (1904).

    Read more quotations about / on: yellow, black
  • 18.
    One seems to believe almost all that they believe; and when they stop short and call it a Religion, and you pass on, and call it only a reminiscence of one, should you not part with the kiss of peace?
    Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881), Scottish essayist, historian. letter, Sept. 10, 1833, to John Stuart Mill. Letters of Thomas Carlyle (1923). On the Unitarians, following a meeting with Ralph Waldo Emerson.

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  • 19.
    What I loved in the man was his health, his unity with himself; all people and all things seemed to find their quite peaceable adjustment with him, not a proud domineering one, as after doubtful contest, but a spontaneous-looking peaceable, even humble one.
    Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881), Scottish essayist, historian. Letter, September 10, 1833, to John Stuart Mill. Letters of Thomas Carlyle (1923). Mill had given Emerson a letter of introduction to Carlyle, which Emerson presented in person.

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  • 20.
    For, if a "good speaker," never so eloquent, does not see into the fact, and is not speaking the truth of that ... is there a more horrid kind of object in creation?
    Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881), Scottish essayist, historian. Address, April l2, 1866, on being installed as Rector of the University at Edinburgh. "Inaugural Address at Edinburgh," Scottish and Other Miscellanies (1915).

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