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Quotations From VIRGIL [PUBLIUS VERGILIUS MARO]

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  • 11.
    O accursed hunger of gold, to what dost thou not compel human hearts!
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Aeneas, in Aeneid, bk. 3, l. 56-7 (19 B.C.), trans. by J.W. MacKail (1908). Alluding to the story of Polydorus, who was killed for his gold by the treacherous King of Thrace during the Trojan War. In Dante's Purgatory, cto. 22, Virgil's lines are seemingly misconstrued by Statius.
  • 12.
    Trust not the horse, O Trojans. Be it what it may, I fear the Grecians even when they offer gifts.
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Laoco"n, in Aeneid, bk. 2, l. 48-9.

    Read more quotations about / on: horse, trust, fear
  • 13.
    I see wars, horrible wars, and the Tiber foaming with much blood.
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. the Sibyl of Cumae, in Aeneid, bk. 6, l. 86 (29 B.C.). Spoken to Aeneas, in his quest to find his father.
  • 14.
    The land of joy, the lovely glades of the fortunate woods and the home of the blest.
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Aeneid, bk. 6, l. 638 (19 B.C.), trans. by David West (1991). Referring to the Elysian Fields, a stop on Aeneas's journey to the Underworld.

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  • 15.
    If I cannot prevail upon heaven, I shall move hell.
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Juno, in Aeneid, bk. 7, l. 312 (19 B.C.), trans. by Kate Hughes (1995). Spoken by Juno on realizing that she will be unable to prevent Aeneas from gaining Latium.

    Read more quotations about / on: heaven
  • 16.
    Look with favor on a bold enterprise.
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Georgics, bk. 1, l. 40 (29 B.C.), trans. by Kate Hughes (1995). The words "annuit coeptis" were inscribed on the reverse side of the Great Seal of the United States of America, June 29, 1782.
  • 17.
    Each of us suffers his own fate in the after-life.
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Anchises, in Aeneid, bk. 6, l. 743 (19 B.C.), trans. by David West (1991). Anchises to his son Aeneas in the Underworld.

    Read more quotations about / on: fate, life
  • 18.
    Roman, remember that you shall rule the nations by your authority, for this is to be your skill, to make peace the custom, to spare the conquered, and to wage war until the haughty are brought low.
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Anchises, in Aeneid, bk. 6. Describing the task of the Romans.

    Read more quotations about / on: remember, peace, war
  • 19.
    Fortune favors the brave.
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Turnus, in Aeneid, bk. 10, l. 284 (19 B.C.). Turnus, King of the Rutulians, fought against and was killed by Aeneas.
  • 20.
    The gates of Hell are open night and day;
    Smooth the descent, and easy is the way:
    But, to return, and view the cheerful skies;
    In this, the task and mighty labour lies.
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. the Sibyl of Cumae, in Aeneid, bk. 6, l. 126-9, trans. by John Dryden. Spoken to Aeneas, in his quest to find his father.

    Read more quotations about / on: night
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