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Quotations From VIRGINIA WOOLF

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  • 61.
    Great bodies of people are never responsible for what they do.
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. A Room of One's Own, ch. 2 (1929).

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  • 62.
    Fiction is like a spider's web, attached ever so lightly perhaps, but still attached to life at all four corners. Often the attachment is scarcely perceptible.
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. A Room Of One's Own, ch. 3 (1929).

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  • 63.
    One of the signs of passing youth is the birth of a sense of fellowship with other human beings as we take our place among them.
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. "Hours in a Library," Times Literary Supplement (London, November 30, 1916).

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  • 64.
    There can be no two opinions as to what a highbrow is. He is the man or woman of thoroughbred intelligence who rides his mind at a gallop across country in pursuit of an idea.
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. "Middlebrow," The Death of the Moth (1942).

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  • 65.
    Somewhere, everywhere, now hidden, now apparent in what ever is written down, is the form of a human being. If we seek to know him, are we idly occupied?
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. "Reading," The Captain's Death Bed (1950).
  • 66.
    "The proper stuff of fiction" does not exist; everything is the proper stuff of fiction, every feeling, every thought; every quality of brain and spirit is drawn upon; no perception comes amiss.
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist, essayist, and diarist. The Common Reader, ch. 13 (1925).
  • 67.
    The word-coining genius, as if thought plunged into a sea of words and came up dripping.
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. "Notes on an Elizabethan Play," The Common Reader, First Series (1925). On the merits of Elizabethan drama.

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  • 68.
    Rigid, the skeleton of habit alone upholds the human frame.
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. Mrs. Dalloway, p. 62 (1925).

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  • 69.
    Yet, it is true, poetry is delicious; the best prose is that which is most full of poetry.
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. "Montaigne," The Common Reader, First Series (1925).

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  • 70.
    Sleep, that deplorable curtailment of the joy of life.
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. "Montaigne," The Common Reader, First Series (1925).

    Read more quotations about / on: joy, sleep, life
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