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Quotations From WALTER BAGEHOT

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  • 1.
    A schoolmaster should have an atmosphere of awe, and walk wonderingly, as if he was amazed at being himself.
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. (Article originally published 1852). Hartley Coleridge, vol. 1, Literary Studies (1878).
  • 2.
    In every particular state of the world, those nations which are strongest tend to prevail over the others; and in certain marked peculiarities the strongest tend to be the best.
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. Physics and Politics, ch. 2, sct. 1 (1872).

    Read more quotations about / on: world
  • 3.
    The habit of common and continuous speech is a symptom of mental deficiency. It proceeds from not knowing what is going on in other people's minds.
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. (Article originally published 1852). Hartley Coleridge, vol. 1, Literary Studies (1878).

    Read more quotations about / on: people
  • 4.
    So long as war is the main business of nations, temporary despotism—despotism during the campaign—is indispensable.
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. Physics and Politics, ch. 2, sct. 3 (1872).

    Read more quotations about / on: war
  • 5.
    Conquest is the missionary of valour, and the hard impact of military virtues beats meanness out of the world.
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. Physics and Politics, ch. 2, sct. 3 (1872).

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  • 6.
    The best history is but like the art of Rembrandt; it casts a vivid light on certain selected causes, on those which were best and greatest; it leaves all the rest in shadow and unseen.
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. Physics and Politics, ch. 2, sect. 2 (1872).

    Read more quotations about / on: history, light
  • 7.
    The whole history of civilisation is strewn with creeds and institutions which were invaluable at first, and deadly afterwards.
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. Physics and Politics, ch. 2, sct. 3 (1872).

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  • 8.
    It is often said that men are ruled by their imaginations; but it would be truer to say they are governed by the weakness of their imaginations.
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. The English Constitution, ch. 2 (1867).
  • 9.
    A slight daily unconscious luxury is hardly ever wanting to the dwellers in civilisation; like the gentle air of a genial climate, it is a perpetual minute enjoyment.
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. repr. In Literary Studies, vol. 2 (1878). "The Waverley Novels," (1858).
  • 10.
    Poverty is an anomaly to rich people. It is very difficult to make out why people who want dinner do not ring the bell.
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. (Article originally published 1858). The Waverley Novels, vol. 2, Literary Studies (1878).

    Read more quotations about / on: poverty, people
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