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Quotations From WALTER BAGEHOT


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  • An element of exaggeration clings to the popular judgment: great vices are made greater, great virtues greater also; interesting incidents are made more interesting, softer legends more soft.
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. repr. In Literary Studies, vol. 2 (1878). "The Waverley Novels," (1858).
  • What impresses men is not mind, but the result of mind.
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. The English Constitution, ch. 8 (1867).
  • A severe though not unfriendly critic of our institutions said that "the cure for admiring the House of Lords was to go and look at it."
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. The English Constitution, ch. 4 (1867).

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  • The best reason why Monarchy is a strong government is, that it is an intelligible government. The mass of mankind understand it, and they hardly anywhere in the world understand any other.
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. The English Constitution, ch. 2 (1867).

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  • An ambassador is not simply an agent; he is also a spectacle.
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. The English Constitution, ch. 4 (1867).
  • When great questions end, little parties begin.
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. The English Constitution, ch. 9 (1867).
  • Women—one half the human race at least—care fifty times more for a marriage than a ministry.
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. The English Constitution, ch. 3 (1867).

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  • A princely marriage is the brilliant edition of a universal fact, and, as such, it rivets mankind.
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. The English Constitution, ch. 3 (1867).

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  • A constitutional statesman is in general a man of common opinions and uncommon abilities.
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. "The Character of Sir Robert Peel," Biographical Studies (1881).
  • Progress would not have been the rarity it is if the early food had not been the late poison.
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. Physics and Politics, ch. 2, sct. 3 (1872).

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