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Quotations From WILLIAM HAZLITT

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  • 51.
    One shining quality lends a lustre to another, or hides some glaring defect.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In Complete Works, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics, no. 162 (first published anonymously in 1823).
  • 52.
    There is not a more mean, stupid, dastardly, pitiful, selfish, spiteful, envious, ungrateful animal than the Public. It is the greatest of cowards, for it is afraid of itself.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Table Talk, "On Living to One's Self," (1821-1822).

    Read more quotations about / on: animal
  • 53.
    No young man ever thinks he shall die.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Table Talk, "On the Fear of Death," (1821-1822).
  • 54.
    A hypocrite despises those whom he deceives, but has no respect for himself. He would make a dupe of himself too, if he could.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 398 (1823).

    Read more quotations about / on: respect
  • 55.
    If we wish to know the force of human genius, we should read Shakespeare. If we wish to see the insignificance of human learning, we may study his commentators.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. First published in Edinburgh Magazine (July 1818). Table Talk, "On the Ignorance of the Learned," (1821-1822).
  • 56.
    Modesty is the lowest of the virtues, and is a real confession of the deficiency it indicates. He who undervalues himself is justly undervalued by others.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Table Talk, "On the Knowledge of Character," (1821-1822).
  • 57.
    He who undervalues himself is justly undervalued by others.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On the Knowledge of Character," Table Talk (1821).
  • 58.
    Anyone who has passed though the regular gradations of a classical education, and is not made a fool by it, may consider himself as having had a very narrow escape.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In Table Talk (1821). "On the Ignorance of the Learned," Edinburgh Magazine (July 1818).

    Read more quotations about / on: education
  • 59.
    Poetry is the universal language which the heart holds with nature and itself. He who has a contempt for poetry, cannot have much respect for himself, or for anything else.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Lectures on the English Poets, "On Poetry in General," (1818).

    Read more quotations about / on: poetry, respect, heart, nature
  • 60.
    He stood bewildered, not appalled, on that dark shore which separates the ancient and the modern world.... He is power, passion, self-will personified.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On Poetry in General," Lectures on the English Poets (1818).

    Read more quotations about / on: passion, dark, power, world
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