Members Who Read Most Number Of Poems

Live Scores

Click here to see the rest of the list

Quotations From WILLIAM HAZLITT

» More about William Hazlitt on Poemhunter

 

  • 61.
    Defoe says that there were a hundred thousand country fellows in his time ready to fight to the death against popery, without knowing whether popery was a man or a horse.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On Prejudice," Sketches and Essays (1839).

    Read more quotations about / on: horse, death, time
  • 62.
    We grow tired of everything but turning others into ridicule, and congratulating ourselves on their defects.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On the Pleasure of Hating," The Plain Speaker (1826).
  • 63.
    The dupe of friendship, and the fool of love; have I not reason to hate and to despise myself? Indeed I do; and chiefly for not having hated and despised the world enough.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On the Pleasure of Hating," The Plain Speaker (1826).

    Read more quotations about / on: hate, love, world
  • 64.
    The humblest painter is a true scholar; and the best of scholars—the scholar of nature.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On the Pleasure of Painting," vol. 1, Table Talk (1821).

    Read more quotations about / on: nature
  • 65.
    The love of liberty is the love of others; the love of power is the love of ourselves.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Political Essays, "The Times Newspaper," (1819).

    Read more quotations about / on: love, power
  • 66.
    A nickname is the heaviest stone that the devil can throw at a man. It is a bugbear to the imagination, and, though we do not believe in it, it still haunts our apprehensions.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Sketches and Essays, "On Nicknames," (1839).

    Read more quotations about / on: imagination, believe
  • 67.
    The least pain in our little finger gives us more concern and uneasiness than the destruction of millions of our fellow-beings.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In Complete Works, vol. 16, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). "American Literature—Dr. Channing," Edinburgh Review (Oct. 1829).

    Read more quotations about / on: pain
  • 68.
    When a thing ceases to be a subject of controversy, it ceases to be a subject of interest.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Complete Works, vol. 20, ed. by P.P. Howe (1932). The Spirit of Controversy, The Atlas (Jan. 31, 1830).
  • 69.
    If the world were good for nothing else, it is a fine subject for speculation.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. in Collected Works, vol. 2, eds. A.R. Waller and Arnold Glover (1902). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 302 (1823).

    Read more quotations about / on: world
  • 70.
    There is nothing good to be had in the country, or if there is, they will not let you have it.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. The Round Table, "Observations on Wordsworth's Excursion," (1819).
[Hata Bildir]