Quotations From WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE


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  • The King's name is a tower of strength.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Richard, in Richard III, act 5, sc. 3, l. 12. Relying on his reputation in fighting against Richmond.

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  • What great ones do, the less will prattle of.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sea Captain, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 2, l. 33. "Less" means social inferiors.
  • I were better to be eaten to death with a rust than to be scoured to nothing with perpetual motion.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sir John Falstaff, in Henry IV pt. 2, act 1, sc. 2, l. 219-21 (1600).

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  • A victory is twice itself when the achiever brings home full numbers.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Leonato, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 1, sc. 1, l. 8-9. On a battle won with almost no loss of life.

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  • If a man do not erect in this age his own tomb ere he dies, he shall live no longer in monument than the bell rings and the widow weeps.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Benedick, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 5, sc. 2, l. 77-80.
  • We are time's subjects, and time bids be gone.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hastings, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 1, sc. 3, l. 110. Time calls on the rebels to act, not to go on talking.

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  • The unruly waywardness that infirm and choleric years bring with them.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Goneril, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 1, l. 298-9.
  • It will be proved to thy face that thou hast men about thee that usually talk of a noun and a verb and such abominable words as no Christian ear can endure to hear.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jack Cade, in Henry VI, Part 3, act 4, sc. 7, l. 37-40. An illiterate peasant accusing Lord Saye of treason.
  • There's no true drop of blood in him to be truly touched with love; if he be sad, he wants money.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Don Pedro, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 2, l. 18-20. Unable to believe Benedick can fall in love; "wants" means is in need of, lacks.

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  • The fashion of the world is to avoid cost, and you encounter it.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Don Pedro, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 1, sc. 1, l. 97-8. To Leonato, who offers hospitality to Don Pedro and his companions.

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