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Quotations From WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

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  • 21.
    I am sure care's an enemy to life.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sir Toby Belch, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 3, l. 2-3.

    Read more quotations about / on: life
  • 22.
    It illumineth the face, which as a beacon gives warning to all the rest of this little kingdom, man, to arm ... this valor comes of sherris.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 4, sc. 3, l. 107-9, 111. On drinking wine or sherry as promoting courage.

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  • 23.
    Runs not this speech like iron through your blood?
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Don Pedro, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 5, sc. 1, l. 245. To Claudio, on learning they were misled into thinking Hero false.
  • 24.
    The better part of valor is discretion, in the which better part I have saved my life.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 5, sc. 4, l. 119-20. Falstaff's "discretion" means avoiding danger on the battlefield by pretending to be dead.

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  • 25.
    Good Lord, for alliance! Thus goes every one to the world but I, and I am sunburnt; I may sit in a corner and cry "Heigh-ho for a husband!"
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, sc. 1, l. 318-20. To Claudio, who claims the privilege through marriage of "alliance" in calling Beatrice cousin; she feels left out, or "sunburnt" means dry and withered.

    Read more quotations about / on: husband, world
  • 26.
    We have here recovered the most dangerous piece of lechery that ever was known in the commonwealth.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Second Watchman, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 3, l. 167-8. The comic watchman means to say "discovered" and "treachery."
  • 27.
    Thou wast a pretty fellow when thou hadst no need to care for her frowning; now thou art an O without a figure. I am better than thou art now; I am a fool, thou art nothing.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Fool, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 4, l. 191-4. To King Lear, who has given his lands to his daughters; an O is nothing without another figure in front of it.
  • 28.
    I had rather have a fool to make me merry than experience to make me sad—and to travel for it too!
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 1, l. 27-9. To Jaques, who has been defining his particular melancholy.

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  • 29.
    Your praise is come too swiftly home before you.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Adam, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 2, l. 9. Orland's good reputation has made his brother hate him.

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  • 30.
    Love sought is good, but given unsought is better.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Olivia, in Twelfth Night, act 3, sc. 1, l. 156.

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