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Quotations From WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

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  • 31.
    Our thoughts are ours, their ends none of our own.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Player King, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 2, l. 213. On the gap between thoughts and deeds.
  • 32.
    There's not a note of mine that's worth the noting.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Balthasar, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, sc. 3, l. 55. Quibbling on "noting" and "nothing," as the play portrays much ado about noting (observing or listening) and a quarrel that springs from nothing.
  • 33.
    I do hate a proud man as I hate the engendering of toads.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ajax, in Troilus and Cressida, act 2, sc. 3, l. 158-9. Nestor wisely comments, "And yet he loves himself."

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  • 34.
    He has the prettiest love-songs for maids, so without bawdry, which is strange.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Servant, in The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 4, l. 193-4. On Autolycus, who is peddling ballads.

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  • 35.
    When rich villains have need of poor ones, poor ones may make what price they will.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Borachio, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 3, l. 113-5. Reporting he has been well paid by Don John to prevent the marriage of Claudio and Hero.
  • 36.
    When you depart from me, sorrow abides, and happiness takes his leave.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Leonato, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 1, sc. 1, l. 101-2. Expressing his pleasure in welcoming guests.

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  • 37.
    There's many a man has more hair than wit.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antipholus of Syracuse, in The Comedy of Errors, act 2, sc. 2, l. 82-3. "Wit" means intelligence or sense.

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  • 38.
    Blind fear that seeing reason leads finds safer footing than blind reason stumbling without fear. To fear the worst oft cures the worst.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cressida, in Troilus and Cressida, act 3, sc. 2, l. 71-3. Proverbial.

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  • 39.
    I am a fellow o'the strangest mind i'the world; I delight in masques and revels sometimes altogether.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sir Andrew Aguecheek, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 3, l. 112-4. He has just changed his mind about staying in Illyria.

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  • 40.
    A good man's fortune may grow out at heels.
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Kent, in King Lear, act 2, sc. 2, l. 157. "Out at heels" literally means threadbare, worn out. Kent is sitting in the stocks, so there's a bitter humor in his remark.
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