Quotations From WILLIS GOLDBECK


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  • I could marry him. Yes, he would marry me. Midgets are not strong, he could get sick.... It could be done, done.
    Willis Goldbeck (1900-1979), U.S. screenwriter, and Leon Gordon (1895-1960), British. Tod Browning. Cleopatra (Olga Baclanova), Freaks, contemplating marrying Hans and killing him for his money (1932). Suggested by Tod Robbins' story "Spurs."

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  • Nothing like being different. Cleopatra, Queen of the Air, married to a dwarf! A dwarf!
    Willis Goldbeck (1900-1979), U.S. screenwriter, and Leon Gordon (1895-1960), British. Tod Browning. Cleopatra (Olga Baclanova), Freaks, on hearing that Hans thinks he's going to marry her (1932). Suggested by Tod Robbins' story "Spurs."
  • We're for statehood. We want statehood because statehood means the protection of our farms and our fences; and it means schools for our children; and it means progress for the future.
    Willis Goldbeck (1900-1979), U.S. screenwriter, James Warner Bellah, co-scenarist, and John Ford. Ransom Stoddard (James Stewart), The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, speaking at the territorial convention for statehood (1962). Based on a story by Dorothy M. Johnson.

    Read more quotations about / on: future, children
  • Yeah, you dames is all alike. You sharpshoot and you cheat, and how you squeal when you get what's comin' to you.
    Willis Goldbeck (1900-1979), U.S. screenwriter, Leon Gordon (1895-1960), British, and Tod Browning. Phroso (Wallace Ford), Freaks, to Venus, who has just had a noisy breakup with Hercules (1932). Suggested by Tod Robbins' story "Spurs."

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  • Look at it. It was once a wilderness, now it's a garden. Aren't you proud?
    Willis Goldbeck (1900-1979), U.S. screenwriter, James Warner Bellah, co-scenarist, and John Ford. Hallie Stoddard (Vera Miles), The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, as they leave Shinbone to return east (1962). Based on a story by Dorothy M. Johnson.
  • Where are his boots?... Put his boots on, Klute, and his gunbelt and his spurs.
    Willis Goldbeck (1900-1979), U.S. screenwriter, James Warner Bellah, co-scenarist, and John Ford. Ransom Stoddard (James Stewart), The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, orders to the undertaker, after looking into the coffin of his old friend Tom Donophon (John Wayne) (1962). Based on a story by Dorothy M. Johnson.
  • We accept her, we accept her, gooble, gobble, gooble, gobble, one of us, one of us, gooble, gobble, gooble, gobble
    Willis Goldbeck (1900-1979), U.S. screenwriter, Leon Gordon (1895-1960), British, and Tod Browning. The Freaks, Freaks, the freaks' chant of acceptance at the wedding feast (1932). Suggested by Tod Robbins' story "Spurs."
  • You can forget what I said about buying the gun. You're a tenderfoot. Liberty Valance's the toughest man south of the Picket Wire—next to me.
    Willis Goldbeck (1900-1979), U.S. screenwriter, James Warner Bellah, co-scenarist, and John Ford. Tom Donophon (John Wayne), The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, advice to Ransom Stoddard (James Stewart) (1962). Based on a story by Dorothy M. Johnson.
  • This is the West, sir. When the legend becomes fact, print the legend.
    Willis Goldbeck (1900-1979), U.S. screenwriter, James Warner Bellah, co-scenarist, and John Ford. Carleton Young (Maxwell Scott), The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, response from the editor of the Shinbone Star, when Ransom Stoddard (James Stewart) reveals that he didn't shoot Liberty Valance, Tom Donophon (John Wayne) did (1962). Based on a story by Dorothy M. Johnson.
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