Quotations From ZORA NEALE HURSTON


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  • Trees and plants always look like the people they live with, somehow.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Seraph on the Suwanee, ch. 1, Scribners (1948).

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  • Sweat, sweat, sweat! Work and sweat, cry and sweat, pray and sweat!
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Fire!! (1926). "Sweat."

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  • Mah sweat is done paid for this house and Ah reckon Ah kin keep on sweatin' in it.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Fire!! (1926). "Sweat."

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  • The Haitian people are gentle and lovable except for their enormous and unconscious cruelty.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Tell My Horse, ch. 7, Lippincott, 1938.

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  • A whisper ran along the edge of the dawn.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Tell My Horse, ch. 5, J.P. Lippincott (1938).
  • It is a curious thing to be a woman in the Caribbean after you have been a woman in these United States.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Tell My Horse, ch. 5, J.P. Lippincott (1938).

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  • To avoid the consequences of posterity the mulattos give the blacks a first class letting alone. There is a frantic stampede white-ward to escape from Jamaica's black mass.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Tell My Horse, ch. 1, J.P. Lippincott (1938).

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  • Humph! Talkin' 'bout me lookin' old! When you pull down yo' britches, you look lak de change uh life.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Janie, in Their Eyes Were Watching God, ch. 7, J.P. Lippincott (1937).

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  • Sometimes, I feel discriminated against, but it does not make me angry. It merely astonishes me. How can any deny themselves the pleasure of my company? It is beyond me.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. "How It Feels to Be Colored Me," The World Tomorrow (May 1928).

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  • I do not weep at the world—I am too busy sharpening my oyster knife.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African American author. How It Feels to be Colored Me (1928).

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