Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: FATE

  • 31.
    Every path but your own is the path of fate. Keep on your own track, then.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 131, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 32.
    I suppose that the great questions of "Fate, Freewill, Foreknowledge Absolute," which used to be discussed at Concord, are still unsettled.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, October 16, 1843, to Lidian Jackson Emerson, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 112, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 33.
    It seems our fate to be incorrect (look where we live, for example), and in our incorrectness stand.
    (Alice Walker (b. 1944), U.S. author, critic. repr. In "From an Interview," In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens (1983). Interview in Interviews with Black Writers, ed. John O'Brien (1973).)
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  • 34.
    Concord's little arch does not span all our fate, nor is what transpires under it law for the universe.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, July 8, 1843, to Ralph Waldo Emerson, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 93, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 35.
    It seems our fate to be incorrect ... and in our incorrectness stand.
    (Alice Walker (b. 1944), U.S. author, critic. Originally published in Interviews with Black Writers, ed. John O'Brien (1973). "From an Interview," In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens (1983).)
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  • 36.
    If you believe in Fate to your harm, believe it, at least, for your good.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Fate," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, fate, believe
  • 37.
    I do not believe in a fate that falls on men however they act; but I do believe in a fate that falls on them unless they act.
    (Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "On Holland," Generally Speaking (1928).)
  • 38.
    The element running through entire nature, which we popularly call Fate, is known to us as limitation. Whatever limits us, we call Fate.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Fate," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
  • 39.
    'Tis weak and vicious people who cast the blame on Fate. The right use of Fate is to bring up our conduct to the loftiness of nature.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Fate," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
  • 40.
    An expense of ends to means is fate;Morganization tyrannizing over character. The menagerie, or forms and powers of the spine, is a book of fate: the bill of the bird, the skull of the snake, determines tyrannically its limits.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Fate," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
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