Quotations About / On: FATE

  • 31.
    Fate is never too generous—even to its favorites. Rarely do the gods grant a mortal more than one immortal deed.
    (Stefan Zweig (18811942), Austrian writer. Sternstunden der Menschheit (Stellar Moments in Human History), p. 45, trans. by Marion Sonnenfeld, S. Fischer Verlag (1953).)
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  • 32.
    ... it is not only our fate but our business to lose innocence, and once we have lost that it is futile to attempt a picnic in Eden.
    (Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973), British novelist, story writer, essayist, and memoirist; born in Ireland. As quoted in Elizabeth Bowen, ch. 2, by Victoria Glendinning (1979). Written in 1946.)
  • 33.
    The slave is doomed to worship time and fate and death, because they are greater than anything he finds in himself, and because all his thoughts are of things which they devour.
    (Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), British philosopher, mathematician. A Free Man's Worship and Other Essays, ch. 1 (1976).)
    More quotations from: Bertrand Russell, fate, death, time
  • 34.
    Your fate is to be what you are. As mine is to be what I am—your master.
    (Griffin Jay, Randall Faye, and Lew Landers. Armand Tesla (Bela Lugosi), The Return of the Vampire, speaking to his unwilling assistant (1943). Additional dialogue by Randall.)
    More quotations from: Griffin Jay, fate
  • 35.
    For the marriage bed ordained by fate for men and women is stronger than an oath and guarded by Justice.
    (Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Eumenides, l. 217.)
  • 36.
    People without firmness of character love to make up a "fate" for themselves; that relieves them of the necessity of having their own will and of taking responsibility for themselves.
    (Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev (1818-1883), Russian author. Letter, June 10, 1856, to Countess Elizaveta Lambert. Turgenev: Letters, ed. David Lowe (1983).)
  • 37.
    Whatever else may divide us, Europe is our common home; a common fate has linked us through the centuries, and it continues to link us today.
    (Leonid Brezhnev (1906-1982), Soviet leader. Speech, November 23, 1981, Bonn, Germany.)
    More quotations from: Leonid Brezhnev, fate, today, home
  • 38.
    It is the customary fate of new truths, to begin as heresies, and to end as superstitions.
    (Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-1895), British biologist. "The Coming of Age of The Origin of Species," Science and Culture (1881).)
    More quotations from: Thomas Henry Huxley, fate
  • 39.
    In days of doubt, in days of dreary musings on my country's fate, you alone are my comfort and support, oh great, powerful, righteous, and free Russian language!
    (Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev (1818-1883), Russian author. Poems in Prose, "The Russian Language," (1882).)
  • 40.
    Actors work and slave—and it is the color of your hair that can determine your fate in the end.
    (Helen Hayes (1900-1993), U.S. actor. On Reflection, ch. 4 (1968). Remembering actor John Drew's search for a little girl who could play her younger self in a production of The Prodigal Husband. Hayes, at thirteen, was playing a ten-year-old, and the child's hair was required to be the same ash-blonde shade as hers.)
    More quotations from: Helen Hayes, color, fate, hair, work
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