Quotations About / On: FIRE

  • 51.
    Don't want no money from you Ethan, no money, Marty. Just a roof over old Mose head and a rocking chair by the fire, my own rocking chair by the fire.
    (Frank S. Nugent (1908-1965), U.S. screenwriter, and John Ford. Mose Harper (Hank Worden), The Searchers, returning to the Jorgensen homestead and the promise of home, after escaping from the Comanches (1956). Based on the novel by Alan Le—ay.)
    More quotations from: Frank S Nugent, fire, money
  • 52.
    For we are not pans and barrows, nor even porters of the fire and torch-bearers, but children of the fire, made of it, and only the same divinity transmuted, and at two or three removes, when we know least about it.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "The Poet," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, fire, children
  • 53.
    The lumberers rarely trouble themselves to put out their fires, such is the dampness of the primitive forest; and this is one cause, no doubt, of the frequent fires in Maine, of which we hear so much on smoky days in Massachusetts.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Ktaadn" (1848) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 45, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, forest
  • 54.
    While there we heard the Indian fire his gun twice.... This sudden, loud, crashing noise in the still aisles of the forest, affected me like an insult to nature, or ill manners at any rate, as if you were to fire a gun in a hall or temple.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Allegash and East Branch" (1864) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 213, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 55.
    We could not well camp higher, for want of fuel; and the trees here seemed so evergreen and sappy, that we almost doubted if they would acknowledge the influence of fire; but fire prevailed at last, and blazed here, too, like a good citizen of the world.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Ktaadn" (1848) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 68, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, fire, world
  • 56.
    Time is the substance from which I am made. Time is a river which carries me along, but I am the river; it is a tiger that devours me, but I am the tiger; it is a fire that consumes me, but I am the fire.
    (Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986), Argentinian author. "A New Refutation of Time," Labyrinths (1964).)
  • 57.
    When a thought of Plato becomes a thought to me,—when a truth that fired the soul of Pindar fires mine, time is no more. When I feel that we two meet in a perception, that our two souls are tinged with the same hue, and do as it were run into one, why should I measure degrees of latitude, why should I count Egyptian years?
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "History," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, truth, time
  • 58.
    The art of an actress is sublimated sexuality. But off the stage the fire must be able to reconvert the steam into body.
    (Karl Kraus (1874-1936), Austrian writer. Trans. by Harry Zohn, originally published in Beim Wort genommen (1955). Half-Truths and One-and-a-Half Truths, University of Chicago Press (1990).)
    More quotations from: Karl Kraus, fire
  • 59.
    When she asked him about birth control, he sat down beside her and talked for half an hour about what a great woman Margaret Sanger was and how birthcontrol was the greatest single blessing to mankind since the invention of fire.
    (John Dos Passos (1896-1970), U.S. novelist, poet, playwright, painter. Don Stevens in 1919, of the trilogy U.S.A., The Modern Library, Random House, Inc. (1937). Speaking to Eveline Hutchins.)
    More quotations from: John Dos Passos, birth, fire, woman
  • 60.
    There is an electric fire in human nature tending to purify—so that among these human creatures there is continually some birth of new heroism. The pity is that we must wonder at it, as we should at finding a pearl in rubbish.
    (John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, February 14-May 3, 1819, to his brother and sister-in-law, George and Georgiana Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 123, ed. Frederick Page (1954).)
    More quotations from: John Keats, birth, fire, nature
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