Quotations About / On: FIRE

  • 61.
    The art of an actress is sublimated sexuality. But off the stage the fire must be able to reconvert the steam into body.
    (Karl Kraus (1874-1936), Austrian writer. Trans. by Harry Zohn, originally published in Beim Wort genommen (1955). Half-Truths and One-and-a-Half Truths, University of Chicago Press (1990).)
    More quotations from: Karl Kraus, fire
  • 62.
    At certain times, men regard poetry merely as a bright flame, but to women it was, and always will be, a warm fire.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. "Album Leaf", Poems (1830).)
  • 63.
    Arguments are like fire-arms which a man may keep at home but should not carry about with him.
    (Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 65 (1951).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Butler, fire, home
  • 64.
    We cannot but pity the boy who has never fired a gun; he is no more humane, while his education has been sadly neglected.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 235, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, education
  • 65.
    There is a slumbering subterranean fire in nature which never goes out, and which no cold can chill.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "A Winter Walk" (1843), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 167, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 66.
    To learn to read is to light a fire; every syllable that is spelled out is a spark.
    (Victor Hugo (1802-1885), French poet, dramatist, novelist. Les Misérables, pt. 4, bk. 7, ch. 1 (1862).)
    More quotations from: Victor Hugo, fire, light
  • 67.
    It was worth the while to lie down in a country where you could afford such great fires; that was one whole side, and the bright side, of our world.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Chesuncook" (1858) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 115, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, world
  • 68.
    O black and unknown bards of long ago, How came your lips to touch the sacred fire?
    (James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938), U.S. author, poet. "O Black and Unknown Bards," st. 1 (written c. 1907), publ. In Fifty Years and Other Poems (1917). Opening lines.)
    More quotations from: James Weldon Johnson, fire, black
  • 69.
    And of poetry, the success is not attained when it lulls and satisfies, but when it astonishes and fires us with new endeavours after the unattainable.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Love," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, success, poetry
  • 70.
    Fate then is a name for facts not yet passed under the fire of thought;Mfor causes which are unpenetrated.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Fate," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, fate, fire
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