Quotations About / On: FIRE

  • 71.
    Whatever beauty we behold, the more it is distant, serene, and cold, the purer and more durable it is. It is better to warm ourselves with ice than with fire.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, November 4, 1860, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 373, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 72.
    Fate, then, is a name for facts not yet passed under the fire of thought; for causes which are unpenetrated.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Fate," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, fate, fire
  • 73.
    We fetch fire and water, run about all day among the shops and markets, and get our clothes and shoes made and mended, and are the victims of these details, and once in a fortnight we arrive perhaps at a rational moment.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Nominalist and Realist," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, fire, water
  • 74.
    This Indian camp was a slight, patched-up affair, which had stood there several weeks, built shed-fashion, open to the fire on the west.... Altogether it was about as savage a sight as was ever witnessed, and I was carried back at once three hundred years.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Chesuncook" (1858) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, pp. 148-150, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, fire
  • 75.
    You can much sooner dry you by such a fire as you can make in the woods than in anybody's kitchen, the fireplace is so much larger, and wood so much more abundant.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Allegash and East Branch" (1864) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, pp. 265-266, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, fire
  • 76.
    And of poetry, the success is not attained when it lulls and satisfies, but when it astonishes and fires us with new endeavours after the unattainable.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Love," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, success, poetry
  • 77.
    It was worth the while to lie down in a country where you could afford such great fires; that was one whole side, and the bright side, of our world.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Chesuncook" (1858) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 115, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, world
  • 78.
    When the villagers were lighting their fires beyond the horizon, I too gave notice to the various wild inhabitants of Walden vale, by a smoky streamer from my chimney, that I was awake.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 279, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, lighting
  • 79.
    I'd never set foot in San Francisco. Of all the Sodoms and Gomorrahs in our modern world, it is the worst. There are not 10 righteous (and courageous) men there. It needs another quake, another whiff of fire—and—more than all else—a steady trade wind of grapeshot.... That moral penal colony of the world.
    (Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. Letter, June 25, 1907.)
    More quotations from: Ambrose Bierce, wind, fire, world
  • 80.
    Forty years after a battle it is easy for a noncombatant to reason about how it ought to have been fought. It is another thing personally and under fire to have to direct the fighting while involved in the obscuring smoke of it.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Billy Budd, Sailor (posthumous), ch 21, eds. Harrison Hayford and Merton M. Sealts, Jr. (1962). A sham quotation.)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, fire
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