Quotations About / On: FISHING

  • 31.
    Memory is a net; one finds it full of fish when he takes it from the brook; but a dozen miles of water have run through it without sticking.
    (Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (1809-1894), U.S. author, physician. The Autocrat at the Breakfast Table, ch. 12 (1858).)
  • 32.
    If a fish is the movement of water embodied, given shape, then cat is a diagram and pattern of subtle air.
    (Doris Lessing (b. 1919), British novelist. Particularly Cats, ch. 2 (1967).)
    More quotations from: Doris Lessing, cat, fish, water
  • 33.
    The sport of digging the bait is nearly equal to that of catching the fish, when one's appetite is not too keen.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 248, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, fish
  • 34.
    Of all nature's animated kingdoms, fish are the most unchristian, inhospitable, heartless, and cold-blooded of creatures.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 94, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, fish, cold, nature
  • 35.
    In a cabinet of natural history, we become sensible of a certain occult recognition and sympathy in regard to the most unwieldy and eccentric forms of beast, fish, and insect.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, ch. 8 (1836, revised and repr. 1849).)
  • 36.
    The inhabitants of the Cape generally do not complain of their "soil," but will tell you that it is good enough for them to dry their fish on.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Cape Cod (1855-1865), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, pp. 222-223, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, fish
  • 37.
    Here's a fish hangs in the net like a poor man's right in the law; 'twill hardly come out.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 2nd Fisherman, in Pericles, act 2, sc. 1, l. 116-18.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, fish
  • 38.
    There isn't any symbolism. The sea is the sea. The old man is an old man. The boy is a boy and the fish is a fish. The shark are all sharks no better and no worse. All the symbolism that people say is shit. What goes beyond is what you see beyond when you know.
    (Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961), U.S. author. letter, Sept. 13, 1952, to the critic Bernard Berenson. Selected Letters, ed. Carlos Baker (1981). Of The Old Man and the Sea published that year.)
    More quotations from: Ernest Hemingway, fish, sea, people
  • 39.
    This island is made mainly of coal and surrounded by fish. Only an organizing genius could produce a shortage of coal and fish at the same time.
    (Aneurin Bevan (1897-1960), British Labour politician. Speech, May 24, 1945, Blackpool. Quoted in Daily Herald (London, May 25, 1945). Bevan's speech occurred on the day when Churchill announced the formation of a Conservative "caretaker" government in the wake of V.E. Day and the dissolution of the wartime coalition. The Conservatives were to be ejected from office two months later following a landslide victory for the Labour Party.)
    More quotations from: Aneurin Bevan, fish, island, time
  • 40.
    Fly fishing may be a very pleasant amusement; but angling or float fishing I can only compare to a stick and a string, with a worm at one end and a fool at the other.
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Attributed in Instructions to Young Sportsmen, Hawker (1859). Never found in Johnson's works, the remark is also attributed to Jonathan Swift.)
    More quotations from: Samuel Johnson, fishing, fly
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