Quotations About / On: FISHING

  • 41.
    The only sure way of avoiding these evils [vanity and boasting] is never to speak of yourself at all. But when, historically, you are obliged to mention yourself, take care not to drop one single word that can directly or indirectly be construed as fishing for applause.
    (Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Oct. 19, 1748, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. II, p. 89, London (1774).)
  • 42.
    Memory is a net; one finds it full of fish when he takes it from the brook; but a dozen miles of water have run through it without sticking.
    (Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (1809-1894), U.S. author, physician. The Autocrat at the Breakfast Table, ch. 12 (1858).)
  • 43.
    At present cats have more purchasing power and influence than the poor of this planet. Accidents of geography and colonial history should no longer determine who gets the fish.
    (Derek Wall (b. 1965), British ecologist. Getting There, ch. 1 (1990).)
    More quotations from: Derek Wall, fish, history, power
  • 44.
    I have a very great fear of love. It is so personal. Let each bird fly with its own wings, and each fish swim its own course.—Morning brings more than love. And I want to be true to the morning.
    (D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by Knopf (1926). The Plumed Serpent, ch. 25, Vintage Books (1951). Teresa (wife of Don Ramon) is speaking.)
  • 45.
    Let a man get up and say, "Behold, this is the truth," and instantly I perceive a sandy cat filching a piece of fish in the background. Look, you have forgotten the cat, I say.
    (Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. Ed. Anscombe (1961). Bernard, in The Waves, entry for Oct. 15, 1914 (1931).)
    More quotations from: Virginia Woolf, cat, fish, truth
  • 46.
    Reason is a supple nymph, and slippery as a fish by nature. She had as leave give her kiss to an absurdity any day, as to syllogistic truth. The absurdity may turn out truer.
    (D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. repr. in Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D.H. Lawrence, pt. 4, ed. E. McDonald (1936). "Introduction to The Dragon of the Apocalypse by Frederick Carter," London Mercury (July 1930). Carter's book eventually appeared under a different title and without Lawrence's introduction.)
  • 47.
    I love all men who dive. Any fish can swim near the surface, but it takes a great whale to go down stairs five miles or more; & if he don't attain the bottom, why, all the lead in Galena can't fashion the plummet that will.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. letter, Mar. 3, 1849, to Evert A. Duyckinck. Correspondence, vol. 14, The Writings of Herman Melville, ed. Lynn Horth (1993).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, fish, love
  • 48.
    To an extinct race it was grass-ground, where they hunted and fished; and it is still perennial grass-ground to Concord farmers, who own the Great Meadows, and get the hay from year to year.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 3, Houghton Mifflin (1906). Thoreau refers to the meaning of the Indian name for this stream, the "Musketaquid.")
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau
  • 49.
    In a cabinet of natural history, we become sensible of a certain occult recognition and sympathy in regard to the most unwieldy and eccentric forms of beast, fish, and insect.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, ch. 8 (1836, revised and repr. 1849).)
  • 50.
    If rightly made, a boat would be a sort of amphibious animal, a creature of two elements, related by one half its structure to some swift and shapely fish, and by the other to some strong-winged and graceful bird.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 13, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, fish, animal
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