Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: FISHING

  • 41.
    Reason is a supple nymph, and slippery as a fish by nature. She had as leave give her kiss to an absurdity any day, as to syllogistic truth. The absurdity may turn out truer.
    (D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. repr. in Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D.H. Lawrence, pt. 4, ed. E. McDonald (1936). "Introduction to The Dragon of the Apocalypse by Frederick Carter," London Mercury (July 1930). Carter's book eventually appeared under a different title and without Lawrence's introduction.)
  • 42.
    I love all men who dive. Any fish can swim near the surface, but it takes a great whale to go down stairs five miles or more; & if he don't attain the bottom, why, all the lead in Galena can't fashion the plummet that will.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. letter, Mar. 3, 1849, to Evert A. Duyckinck. Correspondence, vol. 14, The Writings of Herman Melville, ed. Lynn Horth (1993).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, fish, love
  • 43.
    To an extinct race it was grass-ground, where they hunted and fished; and it is still perennial grass-ground to Concord farmers, who own the Great Meadows, and get the hay from year to year.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 3, Houghton Mifflin (1906). Thoreau refers to the meaning of the Indian name for this stream, the "Musketaquid.")
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau
  • 44.
    In a cabinet of natural history, we become sensible of a certain occult recognition and sympathy in regard to the most unwieldy and eccentric forms of beast, fish, and insect.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, ch. 8 (1836, revised and repr. 1849).)
  • 45.
    If rightly made, a boat would be a sort of amphibious animal, a creature of two elements, related by one half its structure to some swift and shapely fish, and by the other to some strong-winged and graceful bird.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 13, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, fish, animal
  • 46.
    I thought, as I have my living to get, and have not eaten today, that I might go a- fishing. That's the true industry for poets. It is the only trade I have learned.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 248, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, fishing, today
  • 47.
    It enhances our sense of the grand security and serenity of nature to observe the still undisturbed economy and content of the fishes of this century, their happiness a regular fruit of the summer.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 24, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 48.
    The inhabitants of the Cape generally do not complain of their "soil," but will tell you that it is good enough for them to dry their fish on.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Cape Cod (1855-1865), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, pp. 222-223, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, fish
  • 49.
    Here's a fish hangs in the net like a poor man's right in the law; 'twill hardly come out.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 2nd Fisherman, in Pericles, act 2, sc. 1, l. 116-18.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, fish
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