Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: FLOWER

  • 21.
    Paradox is the poisonous flower of quietism, the iridescent surface of the rotting mind, the greatest depravity of all.
    (Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 5, pp. 221-222, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). Settembrini warning Hans Castorp of paradox.)
    More quotations from: Thomas Mann, flower
  • 22.
    One of the most attractive things about the flowers is their beautiful reserve.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Journals, entry for June 17, 1853 (1906). The remark comes after a description of a visitor who "pestered" Thoreau "with his benignity.... They lick you as a cow her calf. They would fain wrap you about with their bowels.")
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, beautiful
  • 23.
    There are no such things as Flowers—there are only gladdened Leaves.
    (John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Fors Claveriga, letter 5 (1871).)
    More quotations from: John Ruskin
  • 24.
    There should always be some flowering and maturing of the fruits of nature in the cooking process.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 237, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, nature
  • 25.
    Not always can flowers, pearls, poetry, protestations, nor even home in another heart, content the awful soul that dwells in clay.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Love," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
  • 26.
    Why does the past look so enticing to us? For the same reason why from a distance a meadow with flowers looks like a flower bed.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Notebooks and Diaries (1817).)
    More quotations from: Franz Grillparzer, flower
  • 27.
    A young bride is like a plucked flower; but a guilty wife is like a flower that had been walked over.
    (Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in Honorine, appeared in the Comédie humaine and the Scènes de la Vie Privée (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971), also appeared in La Presse (1843), later appeared in Vie de Province.)
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  • 28.
    Almost all people descend to meet. All association must be a compromise, and, what is worst, the very flower and aroma of the flower of each of the beautiful natures disappears as they approach each other.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Friendship," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
  • 29.
    Flowers so strictly belong to youth, that we adult men soon come to feel, that their beautiful generations concern not us: we have had our day; now let the children have theirs. The flowers jilt us, and we are old bachelors with our ridiculous tenderness.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Nature," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
  • 30.
    Butterflies ... not quite birds, as they were not quite flowers, mysterious and fascinating as are all indeterminate creatures.
    (Elizabeth Goudge (1900-1984), British novelist. The Child from the Sea, bk. 1, pt. 2, ch. 1 (1970).)
    More quotations from: Elizabeth Goudge
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