Quotations About / On: FLOWER

  • 21.
    Her body calculated to a millimeter to suggest a bud yet guarantee a flower.
    (F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. Tender Is the Night, bk. 1, ch. 24 (1934). Of Rosemary Hoyt.)
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  • 22.
    War is a most uneconomical, foolish, poor arrangement, a bloody enrichment of that soil which bears the sweet flower of peace ...
    (M. E. W. Sherwood (1826-1903), U.S. socialite, traveller, and author. An Epistle to Posterity, ch. 5 (1897).)
    More quotations from: M. E. W Sherwood, flower, peace, war
  • 23.
    A restaurant with candles and flowers evokes more reveries than the Isle of Bali does.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, New York (1984).)
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  • 24.
    The difference between a lady and a flower girl is not how she behaves, but how she's treated.
    (George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Anglo-Irish playwright, critic. (First produced, in German, 1913). Eliza Doolittle, in Pygmalion, act 5, The Bodley Head Bernard Shaw: Collected Plays with their Prefaces, vol. 4, ed. Dan H. Laurence (1972).)
    More quotations from: George Bernard Shaw, flower, girl
  • 25.
    I'll never strike at your past, not even with a flower.
    (Samuel Fuller (b. 1911), U.S. screenwriter. Grant (Michael Dante), The Naked Kiss, to Kelly (Constance Towery), after she has confessed her former life of prostitution to him (1964). Narrated in Kelly's memory of the moment.)
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  • 26.
    I hate flowers—I paint them because they're cheaper than models and they don't move.
    (Georgia O'Keeffe (1887-1986), U.S. artist. repr. In Laurie Lisle, Portrait of an Artist (1986). Quoted in New York Herald Tribune (April 18, 1954). in answer to the remark, "How perfect to meet you with flowers in your hands!")
    More quotations from: Georgia O'Keeffe, hate
  • 27.
    Paradox is the poisonous flower of quietism, the iridescent surface of the rotting mind, the greatest depravity of all.
    (Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 5, pp. 221-222, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). Settembrini warning Hans Castorp of paradox.)
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  • 28.
    One of the most attractive things about the flowers is their beautiful reserve.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Journals, entry for June 17, 1853 (1906). The remark comes after a description of a visitor who "pestered" Thoreau "with his benignity.... They lick you as a cow her calf. They would fain wrap you about with their bowels.")
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, beautiful
  • 29.
    There are no such things as Flowers—there are only gladdened Leaves.
    (John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Fors Claveriga, letter 5 (1871).)
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  • 30.
    There should always be some flowering and maturing of the fruits of nature in the cooking process.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 237, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, nature
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