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Quotations About / On: FLOWER

  • 31.
    There should always be some flowering and maturing of the fruits of nature in the cooking process.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 237, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, nature
  • 32.
    Not always can flowers, pearls, poetry, protestations, nor even home in another heart, content the awful soul that dwells in clay.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Love," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
  • 33.
    Why does the past look so enticing to us? For the same reason why from a distance a meadow with flowers looks like a flower bed.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Notebooks and Diaries (1817).)
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  • 34.
    A young bride is like a plucked flower; but a guilty wife is like a flower that had been walked over.
    (Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in Honorine, appeared in the Comédie humaine and the Scènes de la Vie Privée (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971), also appeared in La Presse (1843), later appeared in Vie de Province.)
    More quotations from: Honoré De Balzac, flower
  • 35.
    Almost all people descend to meet. All association must be a compromise, and, what is worst, the very flower and aroma of the flower of each of the beautiful natures disappears as they approach each other.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Friendship," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
  • 36.
    Flowers so strictly belong to youth, that we adult men soon come to feel, that their beautiful generations concern not us: we have had our day; now let the children have theirs. The flowers jilt us, and we are old bachelors with our ridiculous tenderness.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Nature," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
  • 37.
    If I fail, it is difficult to believe that it matters. Poetry runs in our veins, and over the centuries will flower now here, now there. If it does not come from my pen it will come from another's.
    (Ruth Dallas (b. 1919), U.S. poet. As quoted in Contemporary Poets, 3rd ed., by James Vinson (1980).)
    More quotations from: Ruth Dallas, flower, poetry, believe
  • 38.
    The fundamental steps of expansion that will open a person, over time, to the full flowering of his or her individuality are the same for both genders. But men and women are rarely in the same place struggling with the same questions at the same age.
    (Gail Sheehy (20th century), U.S. journalist. Passages, ch. 1 (1976).)
    More quotations from: Gail Sheehy, women, time
  • 39.
    Crazy idea. Me laying flowers on the grave of him, after ten years of rememberin' to forget.
    (Philip Klein, Barry Connors, co-scenarist, Dudley Nichols, and John Ford. Hannah Jessop (Henrietta Grosman), Pilgrimage, recalling the she drove from home and into the army (1933). Based on the story "Gold Star Mother" by I.A.R. Wylie.)
    More quotations from: Philip Klein, crazy
  • 40.
    Adversity draws men together and produces beauty and harmony in life's relationships, just as the cold of winter produces ice-flowers on the window-panes, which vanish with the warmth.
    (Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1955), Danish philosopher. The Journals of Soren Kierkegaard: A Selection, no. 37, entry for January 1836, ed. and trans. by Alexander Dru (1938).)
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