Quotations About / On: FLOWER

  • 41.
    There are no such things as Flowers—there are only gladdened Leaves.
    (John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Fors Claveriga, letter 5 (1871).)
    More quotations from: John Ruskin
  • 42.
    There should always be some flowering and maturing of the fruits of nature in the cooking process.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 237, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, nature
  • 43.
    Not always can flowers, pearls, poetry, protestations, nor even home in another heart, content the awful soul that dwells in clay.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Love," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
  • 44.
    The way the world is; the diversities in it of flowers, trees, grass, birds, animals and human races it conveys to me the thought that GOD likes diversity; God would not like all humans being of the same religion unless he would have created one flower; one tree, one bird, one animal and one human race
    (none)
    More quotations from: Nero CaroZiv
  • 45.
    Be different. Be original. Nobody will remember a specific flower in a garden filled with thousands of the same yellow flower, BUT they will remember the one that managed to change its color to purple.
    (Suzy Kassem)
    More quotations from: Suzy Kassem
  • 46.
    Why does the past look so enticing to us? For the same reason why from a distance a meadow with flowers looks like a flower bed.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Notebooks and Diaries (1817).)
    More quotations from: Franz Grillparzer, flower
  • 47.
    A young bride is like a plucked flower; but a guilty wife is like a flower that had been walked over.
    (Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in Honorine, appeared in the Comédie humaine and the Scènes de la Vie Privée (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971), also appeared in La Presse (1843), later appeared in Vie de Province.)
    More quotations from: Honoré De Balzac, flower
  • 48.
    Almost all people descend to meet. All association must be a compromise, and, what is worst, the very flower and aroma of the flower of each of the beautiful natures disappears as they approach each other.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Friendship," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
  • 49.
    Flowers so strictly belong to youth, that we adult men soon come to feel, that their beautiful generations concern not us: we have had our day; now let the children have theirs. The flowers jilt us, and we are old bachelors with our ridiculous tenderness.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Nature," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
  • 50.
    The intellectual is a middle-class product; if he is not born into the class he must soon insert himself into it, in order to exist. He is the fine nervous flower of the bourgeoisie.
    (Louise Bogan (1897-1970), U.S. poet, critic. "Some Notes on Popular and Unpopular Art," (written 1943), published in Selected Criticism: Poetry and Prose (1955).)
    More quotations from: Louise Bogan, flower
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