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Quotations About / On: FLOWER

  • 41.
    The intellectual is a middle-class product; if he is not born into the class he must soon insert himself into it, in order to exist. He is the fine nervous flower of the bourgeoisie.
    (Louise Bogan (1897-1970), U.S. poet, critic. "Some Notes on Popular and Unpopular Art," (written 1943), published in Selected Criticism: Poetry and Prose (1955).)
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  • 42.
    Whether the flower looks better in the nosegay than in the meadow where it grew and we had to wet our feet to get it! Is the scholastic air any advantage?
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Journals, journal entry, January 27, 1852 (1906). Reflecting on the possible effect of editing his journals into essays.)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, flower
  • 43.
    Here and there a bird sang, a rose silenced her expression of him, and all the gaga flowers wondered. But they puzzled the wanderer with their vague wearinesses.
    (John Ashbery (b. 1927), U.S. poet, critic. "The Young Son.")
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  • 44.
    It is an odd jealousy: but the poet finds himself not near enough to his object. The pine-tree, the river, the bank of flowers before him, does not seem to be nature. Nature is still elsewhere.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Nature," Essays: Second Series (1844).)
  • 45.
    Thus to him, to this schoolboy under the bending dome of day, is suggested that he and it proceed from one root; one is leaf and one is flower; relation, sympathy, stirring in every vein. And what is that root? Is not that the soul of his soul?
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Oration, August 31, 1837, delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa Society, Cambridge, Massachusetts. "The American Scholar," repr. In Emerson: Essays and Lectures, ed. Joel Porte (1983).)
  • 46.
    Of course we women gossip on occasion. But our appetite for it is not as avid as a man's. It is in the boys' gyms, the college fraternity houses, the club locker rooms, the paneled offices of business that gossip reaches its luxuriant flower.
    (Phyllis McGinley (1905-1978), U.S. poet, author. "Some of My Best Friends ...," The Province of the Heart (1959).)
    More quotations from: Phyllis McGinley, flower, women
  • 47.
    Chastity is the flowering of man; and what are called Genius, Heroism, Holiness, and the like, are but various fruits which succeed it.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 243, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 48.
    The great events of life often leave one unmoved; they pass out of consciousness, and, when one thinks of them, become unreal. Even the scarlet flowers of passion seem to grow in the same meadow as the poppies of oblivion.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Erskine, in The Portrait of Mr. W.H., ch. 1, first published in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine (July 1889).)
    More quotations from: Oscar Wilde, passion, leave, life
  • 49.
    It were as wise to cast a violet into a crucible that you might discover the formal principle of its colour and odour, as seek to transfuse from one language into another the creations of a poet. The plant must spring again from its seed, or it will bear no flower—and this is the burthen of the curse of Babel.
    (Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, published 1840).)
    More quotations from: Percy Bysshe Shelley, flower, spring
  • 50.
    While making this portage I saw many splendid specimens of the great purple fringed orchis, three feet high. It is remarkable that such delicate flowers should here adorn these wilderness paths.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Allegash and East Branch" (1864) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 232, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, purple
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