Quotations About / On: FLOWER

  • 41.
    The desert encroaches on the garden. No matter. Sand will do as well as flowers.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Sixth Selection, New York (1989).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley
  • 42.
    Why not a space flower? Why do we always expect metal ships?
    (W.D. Richter (b. 1945), U.S. screenwriter, and Philip Kaufman. Nancy Bellicec (Veronica Cartwright), Invasion of the Bodysnatchers, suggesting that alien life forms are using plant spores to invade Earth (1978).)
    More quotations from: W.D Richter, flower
  • 43.
    Love has its own instinct, finding the way to the heart, as the feeblest insect finds the way to its flower, with a will which nothing can dismay nor turn aside.
    (Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in A Woman of Thirty, The Works of Honoré de Balzac, vol. V, trans. by George Saintsbury (1971).)
  • 44.
    War is a most uneconomical, foolish, poor arrangement, a bloody enrichment of that soil which bears the sweet flower of peace ...
    (M. E. W. Sherwood (1826-1903), U.S. socialite, traveller, and author. An Epistle to Posterity, ch. 5 (1897).)
    More quotations from: M. E. W Sherwood, flower, peace, war
  • 45.
    The difference between a lady and a flower girl is not how she behaves, but how she's treated.
    (George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Anglo-Irish playwright, critic. (First produced, in German, 1913). Eliza Doolittle, in Pygmalion, act 5, The Bodley Head Bernard Shaw: Collected Plays with their Prefaces, vol. 4, ed. Dan H. Laurence (1972).)
    More quotations from: George Bernard Shaw, flower, girl
  • 46.
    Butterflies ... not quite birds, as they were not quite flowers, mysterious and fascinating as are all indeterminate creatures.
    (Elizabeth Goudge (1900-1984), British novelist. The Child from the Sea, bk. 1, pt. 2, ch. 1 (1970).)
    More quotations from: Elizabeth Goudge
  • 47.
    And so I will take back up my poor life, so plain and so tranquil, where phrases are adventures and the only flowers I gather are metaphors.
    (Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), French novelist. Correspondance, letter, Jan. 14, 1857, to Elisa Schlesinger (1926). During the trial over Madame Bovary.)
    More quotations from: Gustave Flaubert, life
  • 48.
    Paradox is the poisonous flower of quietism, the iridescent surface of the rotting mind, the greatest depravity of all.
    (Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 5, pp. 221-222, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). Settembrini warning Hans Castorp of paradox.)
    More quotations from: Thomas Mann, flower
  • 49.
    Crazy idea. Me laying flowers on the grave of him, after ten years of rememberin' to forget.
    (Philip Klein, Barry Connors, co-scenarist, Dudley Nichols, and John Ford. Hannah Jessop (Henrietta Grosman), Pilgrimage, recalling the she drove from home and into the army (1933). Based on the story "Gold Star Mother" by I.A.R. Wylie.)
    More quotations from: Philip Klein, crazy
  • 50.
    Adversity draws men together and produces beauty and harmony in life's relationships, just as the cold of winter produces ice-flowers on the window-panes, which vanish with the warmth.
    (Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1955), Danish philosopher. The Journals of Soren Kierkegaard: A Selection, no. 37, entry for January 1836, ed. and trans. by Alexander Dru (1938).)
[Hata Bildir]