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Quotations About / On: FOREST

  • 21.
    We should conserve evil just as we should conserve the forests. It is true that by thinning and clearing the forests the earth grew warmer.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 10, p. 191, selection 5[1], number 38, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Unpublished fragments dating to November 1882February 1883. Originally meant to be attributed to Zarathustra in Thus Spoke Zarathustra.)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, evil
  • 22.
    These are not the artificial forests of an English king,—a royal preserve merely. Here prevail no forest laws but those of nature. The aborigines have never been dispossessed, nor nature disforested.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Ktaadn" (1848) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 89, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, nature, forest
  • 23.
    This land is your land, this land is my land, From California to the New York Island. From the redwood forest to the Gulf Stream waters This land was made for you and me.
    (Woody Guthrie (1912-1967), U.S. singer, songwriter. "This Land Is Your Land" (song) (1956). "This land is your land & this land is my land—sure," Bob Dylan wrote in Tarantula (1970),"but the world is run by those that never listen to music anyway.")
    More quotations from: Woody Guthrie, island, forest
  • 24.
    The boys dressed themselves, hid their accoutrements, and went off grieving that there were no outlaws any more, and wondering what modern civilization could claim to have done to compensate for their loss. They said they would rather be outlaws a year in Sherwood Forest than President of the United States forever.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, ch. 8 (1876).)
  • 25.
    The anthropologists are busy, indeed, and ready to transport us back into the savage forest where all human things ... have their beginnings; but the seed never explains the flower.
    (Edith Hamilton (1867-1963), U.S. classical scholar, translator. The Greek Way, ch. 1 (1930).)
    More quotations from: Edith Hamilton, forest, flower
  • 26.
    Look at this poet William Carlos Williams: he is primitive and native, and his roots are in raw forest and violent places; he is word-sick and place-crazy. He admires strength, but for what? Violence! This is the cult of the frontier mind.
    (Edward Dahlberg (1900-1977), U.S. author, critic. "Word-Sick And Place-Crazy," Alms for Oblivion (1964).)
  • 27.
    "Mankind is getting smarter every day." Actually, it only seems so. "At least we are making progress." We're progressing, to be sure, ever more deeply into the forest.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. "Natural Sciences," Poems (1853).)
    More quotations from: Franz Grillparzer, forest
  • 28.
    Your soul ... is a dark forest. But the trees are of a particular species, they are genealogical trees.
    (Marcel Proust (1871-1922), French novelist. "Fragments From Italian Comedy," no. 7, sct. 4, Pleasures and Regrets (1896, trans. 1948).)
    More quotations from: Marcel Proust, forest, dark
  • 29.
    The forest of Compiegne. Look at it. Like a kind grandmother dozing in her rocking chair. Old trees practicing curtsies in the wind because they still think Louis XIV is king.
    (Billy Wilder (b. 1906), Austrian-born U.S. film director, producer, writer, and Charles Brackett (1892-1969), U.S. screenwriter. Tom (Ray Milland), Arise My Love, to Augusta (Claudette Colbert) as their train passes through the forest (1940).)
    More quotations from: Billy Wilder, forest, wind
  • 30.
    It is as when a migrating army of mice girdles a forest of pines. The chopper fells trees from the same motive that the mouse gnaws them,—to get his living. You tell me that he has a more interesting family than the mouse. That is as it happens.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Allegash and East Branch" (1864) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 252, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, forest, family
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