Quotations About / On: FOREST

  • 41.
    Look at this poet William Carlos Williams: he is primitive and native, and his roots are in raw forest and violent places; he is word-sick and place-crazy. He admires strength, but for what? Violence! This is the cult of the frontier mind.
    (Edward Dahlberg (1900-1977), U.S. author, critic. "Word-Sick And Place-Crazy," Alms for Oblivion (1964).)
  • 42.
    "Mankind is getting smarter every day." Actually, it only seems so. "At least we are making progress." We're progressing, to be sure, ever more deeply into the forest.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. "Natural Sciences," Poems (1853).)
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  • 43.
    The forest of Compiegne. Look at it. Like a kind grandmother dozing in her rocking chair. Old trees practicing curtsies in the wind because they still think Louis XIV is king.
    (Billy Wilder (b. 1906), Austrian-born U.S. film director, producer, writer, and Charles Brackett (1892-1969), U.S. screenwriter. Tom (Ray Milland), Arise My Love, to Augusta (Claudette Colbert) as their train passes through the forest (1940).)
    More quotations from: Billy Wilder, forest, wind
  • 44.
    It is as when a migrating army of mice girdles a forest of pines. The chopper fells trees from the same motive that the mouse gnaws them,—to get his living. You tell me that he has a more interesting family than the mouse. That is as it happens.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Allegash and East Branch" (1864) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 252, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, forest, family
  • 45.
    Master of all sorts of wood-craft, he seemed a part of the forest and the lake, and the secret of his amazing skill seemed to be that he partook of the nature and fierce instincts of the beasts he slew.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Speech, September 12, 1835, on the occasion of the second centennial anniversary of the town of Concord. "Historical Discourse at Concord," Miscellanies (1883, repr. 1903).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, forest, nature
  • 46.
    Nowadays almost all man's improvements, so called, as the building of houses and the cutting down of the forest and of all large trees, simply deform the landscape, and make it more and more tame and cheap.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Walking" (1862), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 212, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, forest
  • 47.
    Every tree sends its fibres forth in search of the Wild. The cities import it at any price. Men plow and sail for it. From the forest and wilderness come the tonics and barks which brace mankind.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Walking" (1862), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 224, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, forest, tree
  • 48.
    Homer and Shakespeare and Milton and Marvell and Wordsworth are but the rustling of leaves and crackling of twigs in the forest, and there is not yet the sound of any bird. The Muse has never lifted up her voice to sing.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 328, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, forest
  • 49.
    We certainly leave the handsomest paint and clapboards behind in the woods, when we strip off the bark and poison ourselves with white-lead in the towns. We get but half the spoils of the forest.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Chesuncook" (1858) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 139, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, forest, leave
  • 50.
    The lumberers rarely trouble themselves to put out their fires, such is the dampness of the primitive forest; and this is one cause, no doubt, of the frequent fires in Maine, of which we hear so much on smoky days in Massachusetts.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Ktaadn" (1848) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 45, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, forest
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