Quotations About / On: FOREVER

  • 41.
    Humor must not professedly teach and it must not professedly preach, but it must do both if it would live forever.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. The Autobiography of Mark Twain, ch. 55, ed. Charles Neider, Harper & Row (1959).)
  • 42.
    I flatter myself [we] have in this country extinguished forever the ambitious hope of making laws for the human mind.
    (James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to Thomas Jefferson, January 22, 1786. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 8, p. 474, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991). After the defeat of the Religious Assessment in Virginia.)
    More quotations from: James Madison, forever, hope
  • 43.
    Wrongs are often forgiven, but contempt never is. Our pride remembers it forever.
    (Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Letter, July 1, 1748, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. II, p. 22, London (1774).)
  • 44.
    ...all enjoyment is dependent upon the frailty of human life and human desires ... if we were to have all we want and to live forever, all enjoyment would be gone.
    (Ellen Henrietta Swallow Richards (1842-1911), U.S. chemist and educator. As quoted in The Life of Ellen H. Richards, ch. 9, by Caroline L. Hunt (1912). Written in the 1870s.)
  • 45.
    Literature ... is condemned (or privileged) to be forever the most rigorous and, consequently, the most reliable of terms in which man names and transforms himself.
    (Paul Deman (1919-1983), Belgian-born U.S. literary critic. "Semiology and Rhetoric," pt. 1, ch. 1, Allegories Of Reading.)
    More quotations from: Paul Deman, forever
  • 46.
    The man who is forever disturbed about the condition of humanity either has no problems of his own or has refused to face them.
    (Henry Miller (1891-1980), U.S. author. Sexus, ch. 9 (1949). Miller emphasized that he was referring to "the great majority, not of the emancipated few who, having thought things through, are privileged to identify themselves with all humanity and thus enjoy that greatest of all luxuries: service.")
    More quotations from: Henry Miller, forever
  • 47.
    I do not say a proverb is amiss when aptly and reasonably applied, but to be forever discharging them, right or wrong, hit or miss, renders conversation insipid and vulgar.
    (Miguel De Cervantes (1547-1616), Spanish author. Don Quixote, in Don Quixote, pt. 2, ch. 43 (1615).)
    More quotations from: Miguel De Cervantes, miss, forever
  • 48.
    I really think that American gentlemen are the best after all, because kissing your hand may make you feel very very good but a diamond and a sapphire bracelet lasts forever.
    (Anita Loos (1893-1981), U.S. novelist, screenwriter. Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, "Paris is Divine," (1925). Lorelei Lee's journal entry, April 27.)
    More quotations from: Anita Loos, forever
  • 49.
    But the age of chivalry is gone. That of sophisters, economists, and calculators has succeeded; and the glory of Europe is extinguished forever.
    (Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish Protestant political writer. Reflections on the Revolution in France, p. 66, ed. Pocock (1790).)
    More quotations from: Edmund Burke, forever, gone
  • 50.
    If you want a vision of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face—forever.
    (George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. O'Brien to Winston Smith, in Nineteen Eighty-Four, pt. 3, ch. 3 (1949).)
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