Quotations About / On: FOREVER

  • 71.
    You, Aubrey, are my most complete man. You're a brave, compassionate, kind and content, man. That's your secret—contentment. I'm 24 and I've never known it. I'm forever in pursuit and I don't even know what it is I'm chasing.
    (Colin Welland (b. 1934), British screenwriter. Harold Abrahams (Ben Cross), Chariots of Fire (1981).)
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  • 72.
    The last act is bloody, however pleasant all the rest of the play is: a little earth is thrown at last upon our head, and that is the end forever.
    (Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 210 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).)
    More quotations from: Blaise Pascal, forever
  • 73.
    Generalizations, like brooms, ought not to stand in a corner forever; they ought to sweep as a matter of course.
    (John Lukacs (b.1924), Hungarian-born U.S. historian, educator. Confessions of an Original Sinner, ch. 6, Ticknor & Fields (1990).)
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  • 74.
    Men, forever tempted to lift the veil of the future—with the aid of computers or horoscopes or the intestines of sacrificial animals—have a worse record to show in these "sciences" than in almost any scientific endeavor.
    (Hannah Arendt (1906-1975), U.S. philosopher and political theorist; born in Germany. The Life of the Mind, vol. 2: Willing, ch. 14 (1978).)
    More quotations from: Hannah Arendt, forever, future
  • 75.
    Dear, sweet, unforgettable childhood! Why does this irrevocable time, forever departed, seem brighter, more festive and richer than it actually was?
    (Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904), Russian author, playwright. The bishop's thoughts in The Bishop, Works, vol. 10, p. 188, "Nauka" (1976).)
  • 76.
    Having a child ends forever a man's boyhood, if not his boyishness. Having a child means that the son has, in a real sense, become his father. Sons are for fathers the twice-told tale.
    (Victoria Secunda (20th century), U.S. psychologist and author. Women and Their Fathers, ch. 1 (1992).)
  • 77.
    Through dinner she felt a gradual icy coldness stealing through her like novocaine. She had made up her mind. It seemed as if she had set the photograph of herself in her own place, forever frozen into a single gesture.
    (John Dos Passos (1896-1970), U.S. novelist, poet, playwright, painter. Manhattan Transfer, Houghton Mifflin Company (1925 and 1953). Description of Ellen Thatcher at the moment when she decides to marry George Baldwin, a man whom she does not love, rather than Jimmy Herf.)
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  • 78.
    It is sadder to find the past again and find it inadequate to the present than it is to have it elude you and remain forever a harmonious conception of memory.
    (F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author, and Zelda Fitzgerald (1900-1948), U.S. writer. First published in Esquire (New York, June 1934). "Show Mr. and Mrs. F to Number—," The Crack-Up, ed. Edmund Wilson (1945).)
    More quotations from: F. Scott Fitzgerald, forever, memory
  • 79.
    America is a country that seems forever to be toddler or teenager, at those two stages of human development characterized by conflict between autonomy and security.
    (Anna Quindlen (b. 1952), U.S. journalist, columnist, author. (July 29, 1990). Thinking Out Loud, p. 55, Random House (1993).)
    More quotations from: Anna Quindlen, forever, america
  • 80.
    Censorship is never over for those who have experienced it. It is a brand on the imagination that affects the individual who has suffered it, forever.
    (Nadine Gordimer (b. 1923), South African author. Address, June 1990, to the international Writer's Day conference, London. "Censorship and its Aftermath," published in Index on Censorship (Aug. 1990).)
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