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Quotations About / On: FUTURE

  • 61.
    The normal present connects the past and the future through limitation. Contiguity results, crystallization by means of solidification. There also exists, however, a spiritual present that identifies past and future through dissolution, and this mixture is the element, the atmosphere of the poet.
    (Novalis [Friedrich Von Hardenberg] (1772-1801), German novelist, philosopher, poet. Blüthenstaub (Pollen), fragment no. 109 (1798).)
  • 62.
    Los Angeles gives one the feeling of the future more strongly than any city I know of. A bad future, too, like something out of Fritz Lang's feeble imagination.
    (Henry Miller (1891-1980), U.S. author. "Soirée in Hollywood," The Air-Conditioned Nightmare (1945).)
  • 63.
    We cannot always assure the future of our friends; we have a better chance of assuring our future if we remember who our friends are.
    (Henry Kissinger (b. 1923), German-born U.S. Republican politician, secretary of state. "A Visit to the Shah of Iran," ch. 29, The White House Years (1979). Said of the changing U.S. policy toward the Shah of Iran.)
    More quotations from: Henry Kissinger, future, remember
  • 64.
    I would sum up my fear about the future in one word: boring. And that's my one fear: that everything has happened; nothing exciting or new or interesting is ever going to happen again ... the future is just going to be a vast, conforming suburb of the soul.
    (J.G. (James Graham) Ballard (b. 1930), British author. interview, Oct. 30, 1982, no. 8/9, Re/Search (San Francisco, 1984).)
  • 65.
    The moments of the past do not remain still; they retain in our memory the motion which drew them towards the future, towards a future which has itself become the past, and draw us on in their train.
    (Marcel Proust (1871-1922), French novelist. "The Sweet Cheat Gone," vol. 11, ch. 1, Remembrance of Things Past (1925), trans. by Scott Monkrieff (1930).)
    More quotations from: Marcel Proust, future, memory
  • 66.
    What I'm saying is that a lot of behavior that you are talking about is a direct response of people not having a future, or feeling that they don't have a future.
    (William Julius Wilson (b. 1935), U.S. director of the Center for the Study of Urban Inequality, University of Chicago. New York Times, p. 77 (December 4, 1994).)
  • 67.
    ... living in England does not free the American the way living in France frees him because the french [sic] and the American do not have the sense of going on together, from the beginning they know that there is no going on together no past present and future ...
    (Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author and patron of the arts; relocated to France. "An American and France," (1936). Born, raised, and educated in America, Stein settled in Paris, where she built her reputation as an innovative writer and patron of young artists and avant-garde art.)
    More quotations from: Gertrude Stein, together, future
  • 68.
    O I know they make war because they want peace; they hate so that they may live; and they destroy the present to make the world safe for the future. When have they not done and said they did it for that?
    (Elizabeth Smart (1913-1986), Canadian author, poet. Necessary Secrets, entry for Feb. 18, 1941, ed. Alice Van Wart (1991).)
  • 69.
    A man who can dominate a London dinner table can dominate the world. The future belongs to the dandy. It is the exquisites who are going to rule.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 3.)
    More quotations from: Oscar Wilde, london, future, world
  • 70.
    This country is at present engaged in furnishing material for future authors; not in encouraging its living ones.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Letter, July 20, 1851, to a publisher, Richard Bentley. Correspondence, vol. 14, The Writings of Herman Melville, ed. Lynn Horth (1993). The subject was international copyright.)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, future
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