Learn More

Quotations About / On: FUTURE

  • 71.
    Whenever a mind is simple and receives an old wisdom, old things pass away,—means, teachers, texts, temples fall; it lives now, and absorbs past and future into present hour. All things are made sacred by relation to it,—one as much as another.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Self-Reliance," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, future
  • 72.
    These arts open great gates of a future, promising to make the world plastic and to lift human life out of its beggary to a god- like ease and power.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Works and Days," Society and Solitude (1870).)
  • 73.
    There is only one real tragedy in a woman's life. The fact that her past is always her lover, and her future invariably her husband.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Mrs. Cheveley, in An Ideal Husband, act 3.)
  • 74.
    Every writer "creates" his own precursors. His work modifies our conception of the past, as it will modify the future.
    (Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986), Argentinian author. repr. In Other Inquisitions (1960, trans. 1964). Kafka and His Precursors (1951).)
    More quotations from: Jorge Luis Borges, future, work
  • 75.
    The fact is that all writers create their precursors. Their work modifies our conception of the past, just as it is bound to modify the future.
    (Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986), Argentinian author. "Kafka and His Precursors" ["Kafka y sus precursores"], Other Inquisitions [Otras inquisiciones] (1952). Cf. also the essay on Hawthorne in the same volume, in which Borges says: "Wakefield" prefigures Franz Kafka, but the latter modifies, and sharpens, the reading of "Wakefield." The debt is mutual; a great writer creates his or her precursors. He or she creates them and in some fashion justifies them.)
    More quotations from: Jorge Luis Borges, future, work
  • 76.
    Everything tends to make us believe that there exists a certain point of the mind at which life and death, the real and the imagined, past and future, the communicable and the incommunicable, high and low, cease to be perceived as contradictions.
    (André Breton (1896-1966), French surrealist. repr. In Manifestos of Surrealism (1969). "Second Manifesto of Surrealism," (1930).)
  • 77.
    The fact is, that civilisation requires slaves.... Human slavery is wrong, insecure, and demoralising. On mechanical slavery, on the slavery of the machine, the future of the world depends.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. (repr. 1895). "The Soul of Man Under Socialism," Fortnightly Review (London, Feb. 1891).)
    More quotations from: Oscar Wilde, future, world
  • 78.
    We have all heard of Young America. He is the most current youth of the age.
    Some think him conceited, and arrogant; but has he not reason to entertain a rather extensive opinion of himself? Is he not the inventor and owner of the present, and sole hope of the future?
    (Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. second lecture on discoveries and inventions, Feb. 11, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 356, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).)
  • 79.
    But let the past as nothing be. For the future my view is that the fight must go on.
    (Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Norman B. Judd, Nov. 15, 1858. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 336, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).)
    More quotations from: Abraham Lincoln, future
  • 80.
    The taste for pleasure attaches us to the present. The concern with our salvation leaves us hanging on the future.
    (Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. My Heart Laid Bare, XXXIX (1887).)
    More quotations from: Charles Baudelaire, future
[Hata Bildir]