Quotations About / On: GIRL

  • 61.
    A boy's mind is not so easily sullied as a girl's.... Undesirable knowledge is not an equal shock to the moral nature.
    (Elizabeth Missing Sewell (1815-1906), British author. Principles of Education, Drawn from Nature and Revelation, and Applied to Female Education in the Upper Classes, ch. 28 (1866).)
  • 62.
    I began quite early in life to sense the thrill a girl attains in supplying money to a man.
    (Anita Loos (1894-1981), U.S. humorist, screenwriter, and dramatist. Cast of Thousands, ch. 8 (1977). Loos's husband, John Emerson, was often dependent, directly or indirectly, on her salary.)
    More quotations from: Anita Loos, girl, money, life
  • 63.
    ... health is the obstacle, which ... must stand in the way of a girl's acquiring the intellectual strength, which ... is so invaluable to a boy.
    (Elizabeth Missing Sewell (1815-1906), British author. Principles of Education, Drawn from Nature and Revelation, and Applied to Female Education in the Upper Classes, ch. 32 (1866).)
  • 64.
    If, after I depart this vale, you ever remember me and have thought to please my ghost, forgive some sinner and wink your eye at some homely girl.
    (H.L. (Henry Lewis) Mencken (1880-1956), U.S. journalist, critic. First printed in the Smart Set, December 1921. "Epitaph," from A Mencken Chrestomathy, p. 627, Knopf (1949). He wrote this in the prime of life; I don't think it is his actual epitaph, just another sample of his wit.)
  • 65.
    Any strain upon a girl's intellect is to be dreaded, and any attempt to bring women into competition with men can scarcely escape failure.
    (Elizabeth Missing Sewell (1815-1906), British author. Principles of Education, Drawn from Nature and Revelation, and Applied to Female Education in the Upper Classes, ch. 32 (1866).)
  • 66.
    You may try but you can never imagine what it is to have a man's form of genius in you, and to suffer the slavery of being a girl.
    (George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Deronda's mother, in Daniel Deronda, bk. 7, ch. 51 (1874-1876).)
  • 67.
    A young man is stirred and stimulated by the consciousness of how much depends upon his own exertions: a young girl is ... oppressed by it.
    (Elizabeth Missing Sewell (1815-1906), British author. Principles of Education, Drawn from Nature and Revelation, and Applied to Female Education in the Upper Classes, ch. 29 (1866).)
    More quotations from: Elizabeth Missing Sewell, girl
  • 68.
    I'm going out and get a girl for my picture, even if I have to marry one.
    (James Creelman. Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack. Carl Denham (Robert Armstrong), King Kong, on being told that no actress wants to film on location with him (1933). From an idea conceived by Merian C. Cooper (1893-1973) and Edgar Wallace (1875-1932) (full name Richard Edgar Horatio Wallace).)
    More quotations from: James Creelman, girl
  • 69.
    What girl could fail to make a conquest who collapsed at a man's feet in the moonlight?
    (John L. Balderston (1899-1954), U.S. screenwriter, and Karl Freund. Helen Grosvenor (Zita Johann), The Mummy, to Frank Whemple, who claims to have fallen in love with her at first sight (1932). From the story by Nina Wilcox Putnam and Richard Schayer.)
    More quotations from: John L Balderston, girl
  • 70.
    Suffering predisposes the mind to devoutness; and most young girls, prompted by instinctive tenderness, lean towards mysticism, the obscurer side of religion.
    (Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. In The Works of Honoré de Balzac, vol. IV, trans. by George Saintsbury (1971). Narrator, in Pierrette, originally named Pierrette Lorrain, in Le Siècle (1840); included in the Comédie humaine as a Scène de la Vie de Province (1843).)
    More quotations from: Honoré De Balzac
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