Quotations About / On: GOD

  • 31.
    The abdomen is the reason why man does not readily take himself to be a god.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 5, p. 97, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Beyond Good and Evil, "Fourth Part: Maxims and Interludes," section 141 (1886).)
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  • 32.
    Everything good is the transmutation of something evil: every god has a devil for a father.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 10, p. 195, selection 5[1], number 68, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Unpublished fragments dating to November 1882February 1883. Originally meant to be attributed to Zarathustra in Thus Spoke Zarathustra.)
  • 33.
    One is most duplicitous toward one's god: he is not allowed to sin.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Beyond Good and Evil, "Fourth Part: Maxims and Interludes," section 65 (1886).)
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  • 34.
    Power makes gods. Virtue makes martyrs.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Seventh Selection, New York (1990).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, power
  • 35.
    The gods attend to great matters, they neglect small ones.
    (Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. II, 167.)
    More quotations from: Marcus Tullius Cicero
  • 36.
    The gods help them that help themselves.
    (Aesop (6th century B.C.), Greek fabulist. Fables, "Hercules and the Wagoner.")
    More quotations from: Aesop
  • 37.
    The saying goes that the gods leave a town once it is captured.
    (Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Seven Against Thebes, l. 217.)
    More quotations from: Aeschylus, leave
  • 38.
    The gods thought otherwise.
    (Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Aeneid, bk. 2, l. 428 (19 B.C.).)
    More quotations from: Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro]
  • 39.
    God and nature do nothing in vain.
    (Aristotle (384-322 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Politics, bk. 1, ch. 2. De Caelo, book 1, chapter 4. One expression of the author's thoroughgoing teleological outlook.)
    More quotations from: Aristotle, nature, god
  • 40.
    People invent gods to explain their suffering.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Eleventh Selection, New York (1993).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, people
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