Quotations About / On: GRIEF

  • 1.
    The display of grief makes more demands than grief itself. How few men are sad in their own company.
    (Seneca (c. 5-65), Roman writer, philosopher, statesman. Epistulae ad Lucilium, epistle 99.)
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  • 2.
    Toil is man's allotment; toil of brain, or toil of hands, or a grief that's more than either, the grief and sin of idleness.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 63, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, grief
  • 3.
    Toil is man's allotment; toil of brain, or toil of hands, or a grief that's more than either, the grief and sin of idleness.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi: and a Voyage Thither, ch. 63 (1849).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, grief
  • 4.
    No one ever told me that grief felt so like fear.
    (C.S. (Clive Staples) Lewis (1898-1963), British author. A Grief Observed (1961). Opening words of Lewis's book of mourning for his dead wife.)
  • 5.
    Some crave grief like strong drink.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Tenth Selection, New York (1992).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, grief
  • 6.
    Jealousy is a grievous passion that jealously seeks what causes grief.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Poems (1830).)
    More quotations from: Franz Grillparzer, grief, passion
  • 7.
    After desolation, grief brings back our humanity.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Eighth Selection, New York (1991).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, grief
  • 8.
    Paris: a city of pleasures and amusements where four-fifths of the people die of grief.
    (Sébastien-Roch Nicolas De Chamfort (1741-1794), French writer, wit. Maxims and Considerations, vol. 2, no. 496 (1796, trans. 1926).)
  • 9.
    Like love, grief fades in and out.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Ninth Selection, New York (1992).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, grief, love
  • 10.
    Everyone can master a grief but he that has it.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Benedick, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 2, l. 28-9. Pretending he has a toothache in order to avoid confessing he is in love; "grief" means pain or anguish.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, grief
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