Quotations About / On: HAIR

  • 41.
    That ain't snow, Mike. That's angel hair. We done died and gone to heaven.
    (Charles Beaumont (1930-1967), U.S. screenwriter, and Edward Bernds. Lt. Turner (Patrick Waltz), Queen of Outer Space, looking at the landscape from their crash site (1958). From a story by Ben Hecht (1893-1964); real name Charles Nutt.)
  • 42.
    She also knew old slave songs and I wondered why, when she hummed them, grandmother braided my hair even more softly, as if her fingers became liquid with pity.
    (Simone Schwarz-Bart (b. 1938), Gaudeloupean author. The Bridge of Beyond, p. 52, Éditions du Seuil (1972).)
    More quotations from: Simone Schwarz-Bart, hair
  • 43.
    I'm afraid to look in the mirror. I'm afraid I'm going to see an old lady with white hair, just like the old ladies in the park. A little bundle in a black shawl just waiting for the coffin.
    (Paddy Chayefsky (1923-1981), U.S. author, screenwriter. Catherine (Augusta Ciolli), Marty (1955).)
    More quotations from: Paddy Chayefsky, mirror, hair, black
  • 44.
    The drama critic on your paper said my chablis-tinted hair was like a soft halo over wide set, inviting eyes, and my mouth, my mouth was a lush tunnel through which golden notes came.
    (Samuel Fuller (b. 1911), U.S. screenwriter. Cathy (Constance Towers), Shock Corridor, John Barrett, a newspaperman staying in a mental hospital, hallucinating about his fiancee's seductiveness (1963). Cathy appears in a hallucination saying this.)
    More quotations from: Samuel Fuller, hair
  • 45.
    Gross and obscure natures, however decorated, seem impure shambles; but character gives splendor to youth, and awe to wrinkled skin and gray hairs.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Beauty," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • 46.
    If any personal description of me is thought desirable, it may be said, I am, in height, six feet, four inches, nearly; lean in flesh, weighing, on an average, one hundred and eighty pounds; dark complexion, with course black hair, and grey eyes—no other marks or brands recollected.
    (Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Jesse W. Fell, Dec. 20, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 511, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).)
    More quotations from: Abraham Lincoln, hair, dark, black
  • 47.
    The good judge is not he who does hair-splitting justice to every allegation, but who, aiming at substantial justice, rules something intelligible of the guidance of suitors.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Power," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, justice, hair
  • 48.
    We walk on molten lava on which the claw of a fly or the fall of a hair makes its impression, which being received, the mass hardens to flint and retains every impression forevermore.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Quoted in Robert D. Richardson, Jr., Emerson: The Mind on Fire, ch. 20 (1995).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, fly, hair
  • 49.
    In truth, a mature man who uses hair-oil, unless medicinally, that man has probably got a quoggy spot in him somewhere. As a general rule, he can't amount to much in his totality.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Moby-Dick, ch. 25 (1851).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, hair, truth
  • 50.
    I suppose the fact is that no friendship can stand the breakfast test.... Civilisation has done away with curl-papers, yet at that hour the soul of the Hausfrau is as tightly screwed up in them as was ever her grandmother's hair, and though my body comes down mechanically, having been trained that way by punctual parents, my soul never thinks of beginning to wake up for other people till lunch-time, and never does so completely till it has been taken out of doors and aired in the sunshine. Who can begin conventional amiability the first thing in the morning? It is the hour of savage instincts and natural tendencies; it is the triumph of the Disagreeable and the Cross. I am convinced that the Muses and the Graces never thought of having breakfast anywhere but in bed.
    (Mary A. [Elizabeth, Countess Von] Arnim (1866-1941), Australian-born-British novelist. "September 15th," Elizabeth and Her German Garden (1898).)
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