Quotations About / On: HAPPY

  • 11.
    Happy the people whose annals are vacant.
    (Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881), Scottish essayist, historian. History of the French Revolution, vol. 1, bk. 2, ch. 1 (1837). Quoting "a paradoxical philosopher" in reply to an aphorism of Montesquieu's, "Happy the people whose annals are tiresome.")
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  • 12.
    Happy Rome, born in my consulship!
    (Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher. quoted in Satires, bk. 10, l. 122, Juvenal. satirized by Juvenal as an example of Cicero's lack of poetic style (O fortunatam natam me consule Romam!).)
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  • 13.
    The happy ending is our national belief.
    (Mary McCarthy (1912-1989), U.S. author, critic. "America the Beautiful: The Humanist in the Bathtub," pt. 1, On the Contrary (first published Sept. 1947, repr. 1962).)
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  • 14.
    Men die and they are not happy.
    (Albert Camus (1913-1960), French-Algerian novelist, dramatist, philosopher. Gallimard (1958). Caligula in Caligula, act 1, sc. 4, Pléiade (1962).)
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  • 15.
    Happy is the nation without a history.
    (Cesare Beccaria (1735-1794), Italian jurist, philosopher. On Crimes and Punishments, Introduction (1764). Thomas Carlyle attributes a similar utterance to Charles de Montesquieu, in History of Frederick the Great (1858-1865) bk. 16, ch. 1: "Happy the people whose annals are blank in history-books!")
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  • 16.
    I'm down here all alone, but as happy as a king—at least, as happy as some kings—at any rate, I should think I'm about as happy as King Charles the First when he was in prison.
    (Lewis Carroll [Charles Lutwidge Dodgson] (1832-1898), British author, mathematician, clergyman. Letter, July 20, 1886, to his cousin, Menella Wilcox. The Letters of Lewis Carroll, vol. II, ed. Morton N. Cohen, Oxford University Press (1979).)
  • 17.
    Sir, that all who are happy, are equally happy, is not true. A peasant and a philosopher may be equally satisfied, but not equally happy. Happiness consists in the multiplicity of agreeable consciousness.
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. quoted in James Boswell, Life of Dr. Johnson, entry, Feb. 1766 (1791). Johnson was arguing against the proposition by David Hume (in the essay The Sceptic) that "a little miss, dressed in a new gown for a dancing-school ball, receives as complete enjoyment as the greatest orator, who triumphs in the splendor of his eloquence.")
    More quotations from: Samuel Johnson, happy, happiness
  • 18.
    We must select the Illusion which appeals to our temperament and embrace it with passion, if we want to be happy.
    (Cyril Connolly (1903-1974), British critic. The Unquiet Grave, pt. 3 (1944, revised 1951).)
    More quotations from: Cyril Connolly, passion, happy
  • 19.
    No sane man can be happy, for to him life is real, and he sees what a fearful thing it is.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Satan, in The Mysterious Stranger, ch. 10 (1916).)
  • 20.
    Alimony—The ransom that the happy pay to the devil.
    (H.L. (Henry Lewis) Mencken (1880-1956), U.S. journalist, critic. The Vintage Mencken, ch. 47, p. 232, ed. Alistair Cooke, Vintage (1956).)
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