Quotations About / On: HEAVEN

  • 61.
    You may decry some of these scruples and protest that there are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamt of in my philosophy. I am concerned, rather, that there should not be more things dreamt of in my philosophy than there are in heaven or earth.
    (Nelson Goodman (b. 1906), U.S. philosopher, art dealer. Fact, Fiction & Forecast, ch. 2, p. 39 (1955). Cf., of course, Shakespeare's Hamlet, I, v, 166 "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamed of in your philosophy," but also J.B.S. Haldane's Possible Worlds, "I suspect that there are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamed of in any philosophy.")
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  • 62.
    I suddenly realized that the devout Russian people no longer needed priests to pray them into heaven. On earth they were building a kingdom more bright than any heaven had to offer, and for which it was a glory to die.
    (John Reed (1887-1920), U.S. journalist, author. Ten Days That Shook the World, ch. 10 (1926). On the mass burial of five hundred soldiers and workers in Red Square, November 1917.)
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  • 63.
    I would say here something that was heard from an ecclesiastic of the most eminent degree; "That the intention of the Holy Ghost is to teach us how one goes to heaven, not how the heaven goes."
    (Galileo Galilei (1564-1642), Italian scientist. Letter to the Grand Duchess Christine (1615), p. 63, The Philosophy of the 16th and 17th Centuries, ed. R.H. Popkin, The Free Press, New York (1966). Galileo's defense for his astronomical theories that seemed to conflict with the Bible.)
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  • 64.
    Shall we with pains erect a heaven of blue glass over ourselves, though when it is done we shall be sure to gaze still at the true ethereal heaven far above, as if the former were not?
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 359, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, heaven, blue
  • 65.
    We talk of the Turks, and abhor the cannibals; but may not some of them, go to heaven, before some of us?
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Redburn (1849), ch. 58, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 4, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1969).)
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  • 66.
    The chimney is to some extent an independent structure, standing on the ground, and rising through the house to the heavens; even after the house is burned it still stands sometimes, and its importance and independence are apparent.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 267, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 67.
    Heaven always bears some proportion to earth. The god of the cannibals will be a cannibal, or the crusaders a crusader, and of the merchants a merchant.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Worship," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, heaven, god
  • 68.
    Romeo, of dead, should be cut up into little stars to make the heavens fine. Life, with this pair, has no other aim, asks no more, than Juliet,—than Romeo.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Love," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, cut, life
  • 69.
    It is not their bones or hide or tallow that I love most. It is the living spirit of the tree, not its spirit of turpentine, with which I sympathize, and which heals my cuts. It is as immortal as I am, and perchance will go to as high a heaven, there to tower above me still.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Chesuncook" (1858) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 135, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 70.
    You have conquered, and I yield. Yet, henceforward art thou ... dead to the World, to Heaven and to Hope! In me didst thou exist—and, in my death, see by this image, which is thine own, how utterly thou has murdered thyself.
    (Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. The narrator's double, in "William Wilson," The Gift (1839). Murder as suicide.)
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