Quotations About / On: HERO

  • 31.
    The hero sees that the event is ancillary: it must follow him.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Character," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
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  • 32.
    Unhappy the land that is in need of heroes.
    (Bertolt Brecht (1898-1956), German dramatist, poet. Galileo, in Life of Galileo, sc. 13. responding to Andrea's remark, "Unhappy the land that has no heroes.")
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  • 33.
    The hero is commonly the simplest and obscurest of men.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Walking" (1862), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 224, Houghton Mifflin (1906). This observation ends a long meditation on the Rhine versus the Mississippi, as they symbolize, respectively, the chivalric age of mediaeval Europe and the heroic age of modern, democratic America.)
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  • 34.
    And there is no trade or employment but the young man following it may become a hero.
    (Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Song of Myself, sect. 48, Leaves of Grass (1855).)
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  • 35.
    A hero's love is as delicate as a maiden's.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 288, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 36.
    Carlyle, to adopt his own classification, is himself the hero as literary man.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Thomas Carlyle and His Works" (1847), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 340, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 37.
    The ordinary man is as courageous and invulnerable as a hero when he does not recognize any danger, when he has no eyes to see it. Conversely, the hero's only vulnerable spot is on his back, and so exactly where he has no eyes.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 334, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Human, All-Too-Human, "Man Alone With Himself," aphorism 572, "The Origin of Courage," (1878).)
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  • 38.
    He was ... a degenerate gambler. That is, a man who gambled simply to gamble and must lose. As a hero who goes to war must die. Show me a gambler and I'll show you a loser, show me a hero and I'll show you a corpse.
    (Mario Puzo (b. 1920), U.S. novelist. Fools Die, ch. 2 (1978). Referring to Jordan Hawley.)
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  • 39.
    What with making their way and enjoying what they have won, heroes have no time to think. But the sons of heroes—ah, they have all the necessary leisure.
    (Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. repr. In Music at Night and Other Essays (1949). "Vulgarity in Literature," (1930).)
    More quotations from: Aldous Huxley, time
  • 40.
    Without hesitation, I place Freud among the heroes. He dispossessed the Jewish people of the greatest and most influential of all heroes—Moses.
    (Salvador Dali (1904-1989), Spanish painter. Diary of a Genius, entry for May 11, 1957 (1966).)
    More quotations from: Salvador Dali, people
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