Quotations About / On: HERO

  • 41.
    Ironic and jittery, we are puzzled by the old heroes with their fighting, boasting, and cocksure lovemaking.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Second Selection, New York (1985).)
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  • 42.
    Many heroes lived before Agamemnon; but all are unknown and unwept, extinguished in everlasting night, because they have no spirited chronicler.
    (Horace [Quintus Horatius Flaccus] (65 B.C.-8 B.C.), Roman poet. Odes, bk. 4, ode 9, st. 7.)
  • 43.
    The more characteristic American hero in the earlier day, and the more beloved type at all times, was not the hustler but the whittler.
    (Mark Sullivan (1874-1952), U.S. journalist, historian. Our Times: The United States, 1900-1925, vol. 3, ch. 9 (1930).)
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  • 44.
    Once the state has been founded, there can no longer be any heroes. They come on the scene only in uncivilized conditions.
    (Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831), German philosopher. "Wrong," addition 58, The Philosophy of Right (1821, trans. 1942).)
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  • 45.
    You cannot have power for good without having power for evil too. Even mother's milk nourishes murderers as well as heroes.
    (George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Anglo-Irish playwright, critic. Cusins, in Major Barbara, act 3.)
  • 46.
    You cannot have power for good without having power for evil too. Even mother's milk nourishes murderers as well as heroes.
    (George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Anglo-Irish playwright, critic. (First produced 1905). Cusins, in Major Barbara, act 3, The Bodley Head Bernard Shaw: Collected Plays with their Prefaces, vol. 3, ed. Dan H. Laurence (1971).)
  • 47.
    And there is no trade or employment but the young man following it may become a hero.
    (Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Song of Myself, sect. 48, Leaves of Grass (1855).)
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  • 48.
    The condition-of-England question is a practical one. The condition of England demands a hero, not a poet.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Thomas Carlyle and His Works" (1847), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 341, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 49.
    The youth, intoxicated with his admiration of a hero, fails to see, that it is only a projection of his own soul, which he admires.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Speech, July 24, 1838, at Dartmouth College. "Literary Ethics," Nature, Addresses, and Lectures (1849).)
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  • 50.
    The ordinary man is as courageous and invulnerable as a hero when he does not recognize any danger, when he has no eyes to see it. Conversely, the hero's only vulnerable spot is on his back, and so exactly where he has no eyes.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 334, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Human, All-Too-Human, "Man Alone With Himself," aphorism 572, "The Origin of Courage," (1878).)
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