Quotations About / On: HOME

  • 41.
    I gleaned jests at home from obsolete farces.
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Rambler (London, July 23, 1751), no. 141.)
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  • 42.
    flight from tyranny does not of itself insure a safe asylum, far less a happy home.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. "The Encantadas" (1854), sketch tenth, The Piazza Tales and Other Prose Pieces 1839-1860, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 9, eds. Harrison Hayford, Alma A. MacDougall, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1987).)
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  • 43.
    Home of lost causes, and forsaken beliefs, and unpopular names, and impossible loyalties!
    (Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. Essays in Criticism, preface, First Series (1865). Referring to Oxford University; see Arnold's comment on "cities.")
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  • 44.
    Your praise is come too swiftly home before you.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Adam, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 2, l. 9. Orland's good reputation has made his brother hate him.)
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  • 45.
    A victory is twice itself when the achiever brings home full numbers.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Leonato, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 1, sc. 1, l. 8-9. On a battle won with almost no loss of life.)
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  • 46.
    It is after we get home that we really go over the mountain, if ever.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, November 16, 1857, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 321, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 47.
    Never be the only one, except, possibly, in your own home.
    (Alice Walker (b. 1944), U.S. author, critic. repr. In In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens (1983). "Breaking Chains and Encouraging Life," Ms. (New York, April 1980).)
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  • 48.
    Far travel, very far travel, or travail, comes near to the worth of staying at home.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, August 17, 1844, to Isaac Hecker, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 408, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 49.
    You called me, and I came home to your heart.
    (Robert Browning (1812-1889), British poet. Andrea del Sarto (l. 171). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).)
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  • 50.
    Gladstone in Great Britain and Parnell in Ireland, under the watchword, "Home Rule for Ireland," are fighting the battle of self-government for all mankind.
    (Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822-1893), U.S. president. Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes: Nineteenth President of the United States, vol. IV, p. 289, ed. Charles Richard Williams, The Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society, 5 vols. (1922-1926), Hayes to S.F. Forbes and Charles J. Kirschner (July 10, 1886).)
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