Quotations About / On: HUMOR

  • 11.
    Men's happiness and misery depends altogether as much upon their own humor as it does upon fortune.
    (François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613-1680), French writer, moralist. repr. F.A. Stokes Co., New York (c. 1930). Moral Maxims and Reflections, no. 62 (1665-1678), trans. London (1706).)
  • 12.
    Charlie Chaplin's genius was in comedy. He has no sense of humor, particularly about himself.
    (Lita Grey Chaplin (b. 1908), U.S. actor, second wife of Charlie Chaplin. Radio interview, 1974. Quoted in Richard Lamparski, Whatever Became Of ...?, Eighth Series (1982).)
    More quotations from: Lita Grey Chaplin, humor
  • 13.
    The overwhelming majority of Americans are possessed of two great qualities—a sense of humor and a sense of proportion.
    (Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945), U.S. president. The Wit and Wisdom of Franklin D. Roosevelt, On America, p. 5, eds. Peter and Helen Beilenson, Peter Pauper Press (1982).)
    More quotations from: Franklin D Roosevelt, humor
  • 14.
    From sixteen to twenty, all women, kept in humor by their hopes and by their attractions, appear to be good-natured.
    (Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). John Greville, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 1, letter 2, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Richardson, humor, women
  • 15.
    Good taste and humour are a contradiction in terms, like a chaste whore.
    (Malcolm Muggeridge (1903-1990), British journalist. quoted in Time (New York, Sept. 14, 1953). Defending his editorship of the humorous magazine Punch.)
    More quotations from: Malcolm Muggeridge
  • 16.
    An emotional man may possess no humor, but a humorous man usually has deep pockets of emotion, sometimes tucked away or forgotten.
    (Constance Rourke (1885-1941), U.S. author. American Humor, ch. 1 (1931).)
    More quotations from: Constance Rourke, humor, sometimes
  • 17.
    The whimsicalness of our own humor is a thousand times more fickle and unaccountable than what we blame so much in fortune.
    (François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613-1680), French writer, moralist. repr. F.A. Stokes Co., New York (c. 1930). Moral Maxims and Reflections, no. 46 (1665-1678), trans. London (1706).)
  • 18.
    Humor does not rescue us from unhappiness, but enables us to move back from it a little.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Seventh Selection, New York (1990).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, humor
  • 19.
    Oversimplified, Mercier's Hypothesis would run like this: "Wit is always absurd and true, humor absurd and untrue."
    (Vivian Mercier (b. 1919), Irish-born U.S. critic, educator. "Truth and Laughter: A Theory of Wit and Humor," The Nation (August 6, 1960).)
    More quotations from: Vivian Mercier, humor
  • 20.
    Humour is by far the most significant activity of the human brain.
    (Edward De Bono (b. 1933), British writer. Daily Mail (London, January 29, 1990). On thinking processes.)
    More quotations from: Edward De Bono
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