Quotations About / On: IMAGINATION

  • 31.
    Memory is imagination pinned down.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Sixth Selection, New York (1989).)
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  • 32.
    Imagination at wit's end spreads its sad wings.
    (Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. The narrator, in Ill Seen Ill Said, p. 17, Grove Press (1981).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Beckett, sad, imagination
  • 33.
    The imaginations which people have of one another are the solid facts of society.
    (Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 3 (1902).)
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  • 34.
    Taste is nothing but an enlarged capacity for receiving pleasure from works of imagination.
    (William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On Taste," Sketches and Essays (1839).)
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  • 35.
    ... the imagination needs moodling,—long, inefficient, happy idling, dawdling and puttering.
    (Brenda Ueland (1891-1985), U.S. author and writing teacher. If You Want to Write, 2nd. ed., ch. 4 (1938).)
    More quotations from: Brenda Ueland, imagination, happy
  • 36.
    ... an actor is exactly as big as his imagination.
    (Minnie Maddern Fiske (1865-1932), U.S. actor. As quoted in Mrs. Fiske: Her Views on Actors, Acting and the Problems of Production, ch. 3, by Alexander Woollcott (1917).)
    More quotations from: Minnie Maddern Fiske, imagination
  • 37.
    Where there is no imagination there is no horror.
    (Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), British author. Sherlock Holmes, in A Study in Scarlet, ch. 5 (1887).)
    More quotations from: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, imagination
  • 38.
    Only in your imagination can you revise.
    (Fay Wray (b. 1907), U.S. screen actor. International Herald Tribune (Paris, Feb. 22, 1989).)
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  • 39.
    The greenest island of my imagination.
    (George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. letter, Nov. 17, 1816, to poet Thomas Moore. Byron's Letters and Journals, vol. 5, ed. Leslie A. Marchand (1973-1981).)
  • 40.
    Literary imagination is an aesthetic object offered by a writer to a lover of books.
    (Gaston Bachelard (1884-1962), French scientist, philosopher, literary theorist. "A Retrospective Glance at the Lifework of a Master of Books," Fragments of a Poetics of Fire (1988, trans. 1990).)
    More quotations from: Gaston Bachelard, imagination
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