Quotations About / On: IMAGINE

  • 1.
    I can imagine living without food. I cannot imagine living without books.
    (Alice Foote MacDougall (1867-1945), U.S. businesswoman. The Autobiography of a Business Woman, ch. 2 (1928). Recalling her childhood self-education in her grandfather's library, where she read works by Lewis Carroll, Edward Lear, Louisa May Alcott, Shakespeare, Smollett, Shelley, Spenser, Browning, Emerson, and George Eliot, among other writers.)
  • 2.
    Man is an imagining being.
    (Gaston Bachelard (1884-1962), French scientist, philosopher, literary theorist. The Poetics of Reverie, ch. 2, sct. 10 (1960, trans. 1969).)
    More quotations from: Gaston Bachelard
  • 3.
    I can imagine many things, but few clearly.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Fourth Selection, New York (1987).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, imagine
  • 4.
    'If you want to be great in life, keep the past in mind, follow the present and imagine the future'.
    (- - Indian Poet, Pijush Biswas [12July,1988], published first on PoemHunter)
    More quotations from: Pijush Biswas
  • 5.
    the power of words - they can take you anywhere you can imagine.
    (JOHN TIONG CHUNGHOO)
    More quotations from: john tiong chunghoo
  • 6.
    Yes life can be a simple thing if we let it
    or if we just get our hands dirty
    It could be what we never imagined
    (change)
    More quotations from: Frederick J.B. Moore II
  • 7.
    Life wouldn't be so beautiful if everything would happen as we imagined in our dreams.
    (life)
    More quotations from: Lonely Voyager
  • 8.
    No one is more dangerous than he who imagines himself pure in heart: for his purity, by definition, is unassailable.
    (James Baldwin (1924-1987), U.S. author. repr. In Nobody Knows My Name (1961). "The Black Boy Looks at the White Boy," Esquire (New York, May 1961).)
    More quotations from: James Baldwin, heart
  • 9.
    War was then no longer this noble and unified outburst of souls in love with glory that he had imagined from Napoleon's proclamations.
    (Stendhal [Marie Henri Beyle] (1783-1842), French novelist. The Charterhouse of Parma, ch. III, Dupont (1839) (trans. by Jeri King).)
  • 10.
    True kindness presupposes the faculty of imagining as one's own the suffering and joys of others.
    (André Gide (1869-1951), French author. "Portraits and Aphorisms," Pretexts (1903).)
    More quotations from: André Gide
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