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Quotations About / On: IMAGINE

  • 21.
    If you want a vision of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face—forever.
    (George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. O'Brien to Winston Smith, in Nineteen Eighty-Four, pt. 3, ch. 3 (1949).)
  • 22.
    I don't know how to defend myself: surprised innocence cannot imagine being under suspicion.
    (Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Rodogune, in Rodogune, act 5, sc. 4 (1644).)
    More quotations from: Pierre Corneille, innocence, imagine
  • 23.
    ... the function of art is to do more than tell it like it is—it's to imagine what is possible.
    (bell hooks (b. c. 1955), African American author, feminist, and human rights advocate. Outlaw Culture, ch. 19 (1994).)
    More quotations from: bell hooks, imagine
  • 24.
    The function of the actor is to make the audience imagine for the moment that real things are happening to real people.
    (George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Anglo-Irish playwright, critic. First published in Herbert Beerbohm Tree: Some Memories of Him and His Art (1920). "From the Point of View of the Playwright," The Drama Observed , ed. Bernard F. Dukore, Penn State Press (1993).)
    More quotations from: George Bernard Shaw, imagine, people
  • 25.
    The facts, even the real ones, must be imagined before they can be stated.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Sixth Selection, New York (1989).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley
  • 26.
    You are as happy as you think you are, but not necessarily as miserable as you imagine.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Ninth Selection, New York (1992).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, imagine, happy
  • 27.
    I had always imagined that Cliché was a suburb of Paris, until I discovered it to be a street in Oxford.
    (Philip Guedalla (1889-1944), British author. "Some Historians," Supers and Supermen (1920).)
    More quotations from: Philip Guedalla, paris
  • 28.
    When our vices leave us, we like to imagine it is we who are leaving them.
    (François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613-1680), French writer, moralist. repr. F.A. Stokes Co., New York (c. 1930). Moral Maxims and Reflections, no. 193 (1665-1678), trans. London (1706).)
  • 29.
    Science becomes dangerous only when it imagines that it has reached its goal.
    (George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Anglo-Irish playwright, critic. (1911). The Doctor's Dilemma, preface, The Bodley Head Bernard Shaw: Collected Plays with their Prefaces, vol. 3, ed. Dan H. Laurence (1971).)
    More quotations from: George Bernard Shaw
  • 30.
    Old men, imagining themselves under obligation to young paramours, seldom keep any thing from their knowledge.
    (Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Anna Howe, in Clarissa, vol. 5, p. 36, AMS Press (1990).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Richardson
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