Quotations About / On: IMAGINE

  • 51.
    Books are for the most part willfully and hastily written, as parts of a system to supply a want real or imagined.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 100, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 52.
    We are ashamed to seem evasive in the presence of a straightforward man, cowardly in the presence of a brave one, gross in the eyes of a refined one, and so on. We always imagine, and in imagining share, the judgments of the other mind.
    (Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 5 (1902).)
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  • 53.
    We have no higher life that is really apart from other people. It is by imagining them that our personality is built up; to be without the power of imagining them is to be a low-grade idiot.
    (Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 3 (1902).)
  • 54.
    When you're right in the market, it's the best high you can imagine. It's a high without any alcohol. When you're wrong, it's the lowest low you can imagine.
    (Michelle Miller (b. c. 1950), U.S. commodities broker. As quoted in The Great Divide, book 1, section 5, by Studs Terkel (1988).)
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  • 55.
    We are ashamed to seem evasive in the presence of a straightforward man, cowardly in the presence of a brave one, gross in the eyes of a refined one, and so on. We always imagine, and in imagining share, the judgments of the other mind.
    (Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 5 (1902).)
    More quotations from: Charles Horton Cooley, imagine
  • 56.
    I am prisoner of a gaudy and unlivable present, where all forms of human society have reached an extreme of their cycle and there is no imagining what new forms they may assume.
    (Italo Calvino (1923-1985), Italian author, critic. "The Great Khan," pp. 135-136, Invisible Cities (1972, trans. 1974).)
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  • 57.
    The movies today are too rich to have any room for genuine artists. They produce a few passable craftsmen, but no artists. Can you imagine a Beethoven making $100,000 a year?
    (H.L. (Henry Lewis) Mencken (1880-1956), U.S. journalist. "Appendix from Moronia," Prejudices (1937).)
  • 58.
    Pornographers subvert this last, vital privacy; they do our imagining for us. They take away the words that were of the night and shout them over the roof-tops, making them hollow.
    (George Steiner (b. 1929), French-born U.S. critic, novelist. "Nightworks," Language and Silence (1967).)
    More quotations from: George Steiner, night
  • 59.
    [A] Dada exhibition. Another one! What's the matter with everyone wanting to make a museum piece out of Dada? Dada was a bomb ... can you imagine anyone, around half a century after a bomb explodes, wanting to collect the pieces, sticking it together and displaying it?
    (Max Ernst (1891-1976), German painter, poet. Quoted in C.W.E. Bigsby, Dada and Surrealism, ch. 1 (1972).)
    More quotations from: Max Ernst, imagine, together
  • 60.
    Comedy has to be done en clair. You can't blunt the edge of wit or the point of satire with obscurity. Try to imagine a famous witty saying that is not immediately clear.
    (James Thurber (1894-1961), U.S. humorist, illustrator. Letter, March 11, 1954, to critic and poet Malcolm Cowley. Collecting Himself (1989).)
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