Quotations About / On: IMAGINE

  • 51.
    It is said that some Western steamers can run on a heavy dew, whence we can imagine what a canoe may do.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Allegash and East Branch" (1864) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 272, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 52.
    We imagined that the sun shining on their bare heads had stamped a liberal and public character on their most private thoughts.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 226, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 53.
    One can hardly imagine a more healthful employment, or one more favorable to contemplation and the observation of nature.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 221, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 54.
    A rich rogue now-a-days is fit company for any gentleman; and the world, my dear, hath not such a contempt for roguery as you imagine.
    (John Gay (1685-1732), British dramatist. Peachum, in The Beggar's Opera, act 1, sc. 9.)
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  • 55.
    I can imagine myself on my death-bed, spent utterly with lust to touch the next world, like a boy asking for his first kiss from a woman.
    (Aleister Crowley (1875-1947), British occultist. The Confessions of Aleister Crowley, ch. 54 (1929, rev. 1970).)
  • 56.
    Imagine my surprise, nay, my consternation, when without moving from his privacy, Bartleby in a singularly mild, firm voice, replied, "I would prefer not to."
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. "Bartleby" (1853), The Piazza Tales and Other Prose Pieces 1839-1860, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 9, eds. Harrison Hayford, Alma A. MacDougall, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1987). One of many instances in which Bartleby uses this phrase to refuse to work.)
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  • 57.
    Books are for the most part willfully and hastily written, as parts of a system to supply a want real or imagined.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 100, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 58.
    “Imagining the future is a kind of nostalgia. (...) You spend your whole life stuck in the labyrinth, thinking about how youll escape it one day, and how awesome it will be, and imagining that future keeps you going, but you never do it. You just use the future to escape the present.” Looking for Alaska
    ()
    More quotations from: John Green
  • 59.
    We are ashamed to seem evasive in the presence of a straightforward man, cowardly in the presence of a brave one, gross in the eyes of a refined one, and so on. We always imagine, and in imagining share, the judgments of the other mind.
    (Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 5 (1902).)
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  • 60.
    We have no higher life that is really apart from other people. It is by imagining them that our personality is built up; to be without the power of imagining them is to be a low-grade idiot.
    (Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 3 (1902).)
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