Quotations About / On: IMAGINE

  • 71.
    Our argument ... will result, not upon logic by itself—though without logic we should never have got to this point—but upon the fortunate contingent fact that people who would take this logically possible view, after they had really imagined themselves in the other man's position, are extremely rare.
    (Richard M. Hare (b. 1919), British philosopher. Freedom and Reason, p. 171, Oxford University Press (1963).)
    More quotations from: Richard M Hare, people
  • 72.
    Frigidity is desire imagined by a woman who doesn't desire the man offering himself to her. It's the desire of a woman for a man who hasn't yet come to her, whom she doesn't yet know. She's faithful to this stranger even before she belongs to him. Frigidity is the non-desire for whatever is not him.
    (Marguerite Duras (b. 1914), French author, filmmaker. "Men," Practicalities (1987, trans. 1990).)
    More quotations from: Marguerite Duras, woman
  • 73.
    Perhaps a man like you can't realize what it is to have a conscience and no memory at all. Do you imagine it's pleasant to be ashamed of something you can't even remember?
    (Orson Welles (1915-1985), U.S. filmmaker, actor, producer, and Report. Gregory Arkadin (Orson Welles), Mr. Arkadin, to adventurer Guy Van Stratten (1955).)
  • 74.
    I'd hate to be a teetotaller. Imagine getting up in the morning and knowing that's as good as you're going to feel all day.
    (Dean Martin (b. 1917), U.S. actor, singer. Quoted in Leslie Halliwell, Halliwell's Filmgoer's Companion (1984).)
    More quotations from: Dean Martin, imagine, hate
  • 75.
    Well, kid, there are more things in this life than you can possibly imagine. I knew a whore once in Wilmington. She had a glass eye. She used to take it out and work people off for a dollar.
    (Robert Towne (b. 1936), U.S. screenwriter, and Hal Ashby. Budduskey (Jack Nicholson), The Last Detail, to a young sailor (1973).)
  • 76.
    Imagine believing in the control of inflation by curbing the money supply! That is like deciding to stop your dog fouling the sidewalk by plugging up its rear end. It is highly unlikely to succeed, but if it does it kills the hound.
    (Michael D. Stephens. "On Sinai, There's No Economics," New York Times (Nov. 13, 1981).)
  • 77.
    Happy or unhappy, families are all mysterious. We have only to imagine how differently we would be described—and will be, after our deaths—by each of the family members who believe they know us.
    (Gloria Steinem (b. 1934), U.S. feminist writer, editor. "Ruth's Song," Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions (1984).)
  • 78.
    Most people get a fair amount of fun out of their lives, but on balance life is suffering, and only the very young or the very foolish imagine otherwise.
    (George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. "Lear, Tolstoy and the Fool," Shooting an Elephant (1950).)
  • 79.
    And forever goodbye! Forever! Oh, Sir, can you imagine how dreadful this cruel word sounds when one loves?
    (Jean Racine (1639-1699), French playwright. Berenice, in Berenice, act 4, sc. 5 (1670). Berenice is being forced to leave Titus forever.)
    More quotations from: Jean Racine, forever, imagine
  • 80.
    We are at heart so profoundly anarchistic that the only form of state we can imagine living in is Utopian; and so cynical that the only Utopia we can believe in is authoritarian.
    (Lionel Trilling (1905-1975), U.S. critic. Notebook entry, 1948. Partisan Review 50th Anniversary Edition, ed. William Philips (1985).)
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